Lake Ozark voters to consider four-year terms for elected officials in April

Dan Field
newsroom@lakesunonline.com
Lake Ozark voters to consider four-year elected official terms in April.

Lake Ozark voters will consider when they go to the polls April 6 if the terms of elected officials should be extended to four years.

The board of aldermen recently voted to amend the city’s ordinances to allow for four-year terms rather than the current two-year terms for aldermen and mayor if approved by voters. If voters agree, the change will not take effect until the Municipal Elections in April 2022. It would not affect any of the positions open in the April 6, 2021, election.

The idea was first officially discussed at a board of aldermen workshop last fall. While none of the current elected officials would be affected, the basis for the change is that four-year terms would allow aldermen to gain a better understanding of the complexities of city government.

Alderman Dennis Klautzer has noted several times that it takes two years to understand how city government functions.

Alderman Judy Neels wondered if it would be more difficult to find residents who would want to commit to four years.

“At end of day, let’s face it, it’s the voters that decide,” Alderman Mark Maples noted. Let’s put it out there and let the voters decide.”

There would be no financial impact on the city if approved.

Other news

•Mayor Gerry Murawski noted that Beaver’s at the Dam, closed for about two years, has been sold and should be open by spring. Along with Beaver’s reopening, the Lake Race will be coming back to Lake Ozark and the lake after a one-year absence due to COVID-19. According to the OPA (Offshore Powerboating Association) online schedule, the race will be held June 3-5.

•Mayor Murawski also noted that he has spearheaded an effort to bring mayors who represent the Lake of the Ozarks together in a coalition to represent the lake as a unified voice.