Agents receive numerous calls every spring and summer concerning orphaned animals. It is important to remember that in most cases baby animals are rarely abandoned. Typically, the wildlife parent is afraid of people and will retreat when approached. If the baby animal is left alone, the parent will usually return.

This is Camden County Conservation Agent Derek Warnke reminding everyone that early summer is finally upon us. The onset of spring is also the onset of an abundance of baby animals.

Agents receive numerous calls every spring and summer concerning orphaned animals. It is important to remember that in most cases baby animals are rarely abandoned. Typically, the wildlife parent is afraid of people and will retreat when approached. If the baby animal is left alone, the parent will usually return. This is common as parent animals cannot constantly tend to their young. Often, their absence may be due to the many hours spent each day gathering food.

It is usually not practical or desirable for common wildlife species to be captured by humans and raised for later release into the wild. In most cases, it is illegal to keep wildlife in captivity and it frequently leads to animals that are ill-equipped for life in the wild. When deprived of their natural habitat, these animals are denied of the essential survival skills they will inherit from their parents. Additionally, these animals normally don’t survive the stresses of captivity. While it may make us feel better, we are usually not doing wild animals any favors by intervening in the natural cycle of birth, reproduction and death.

If you suspect an animal has been abandoned, leave the animal where it is and contact your local Conservation office.