Three students from the Camdenton High School Research program were selected at the Missouri region to compete nationally at the Junior Science Engineering and Humanities Symposium (JSHS).

Three students from the Camdenton High School Research program were selected at the Missouri region to compete nationally at the Junior Science Engineering and Humanities Symposium (JSHS). Only five students from each region are selected for this national competition.

It was quite an honor for students from Camdenton to represent three of those spots. Each student was interviewed by a panel of experts in their respective fields of research and three students were selected as overall winners. A total of nearly 150 students who were selected as finalists in their respective regions shared their research 'poster' remotely and were interviewed by these experts using an online platform. Camdenton High School is honored to announce that two of the top three winners (including 1st place) were from Camdenton High School! Results from the National JSHS were:

1st place in the US: Emma Price (Synthesis of Human Urine into Carbon Dots for Implementation as a Visual Arsenic Assay in Water) * Emma developed a first of it's kind visual test to detect arsenic in water for application in developing countries with only urine as a raw ingredient. This test would allow anyone to determine the safety of a water source by taking a small sample and following a relatively simple protocol. The results are visual so absolutely no instrumentation is needed for Emma's test.

3rd place in the US: Irelyn Meckley (The Engineering of a Biomimetic Airfoil to Reduce Cavitation and Reynold’s number in Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAVs) for Commercial and Military Applications) *As a result of extensive research and an in-person visit with the state entomologist, Irelyn was able to mimic various wing designs used by insects to develop a hybrid novel design to reduce drag and noise produced by propellers on drones. Irelyn, along with another research student (Jake Thoenen) designed and constructed a research-grade water tunnel using special dyes, an ultraviolet laser, and high resolution camera to visually detect a physical phenomenon called cavitation. Irelyn's designs were developed using Computer Assisted Design (CAD) and 3D printing technology.

Finalist (oral presenter): Hannah Rogers (Application-Based Integration of Motile Near-Infrared and Electrochemical Sensors with Realtime, In-Situ Indication of Nitrate-Induced Crop Stress) * Hannah developed an integrated system that couples sensors and hardware to a device that would ride along on an existing center-pivot irrigation system to send real-time data to an app designed specifically for this study.

The system notifies farmers of specific locations within the field that require more, or less, nitrogen fertilizer (called Precision Agriculture). Through extensive coding and integration with Google Maps, the app displays a color-coded map of each agriculture field with timely, and very specific, data to both save farmers money and reduce the potential of over-fertilizing which can severely degrade local waterways.