Camden County Museum staff found their building forced into and stolen from in the early morning hours of August 8, 2016. Among the items lost, museum worker Kitt Kitterman says they lost a civil war rifle, a WWII era Hawaiian dollar bill, cash and 151 unique arrowheads. In a turn of good news, the museum has now recovered a majority of the items lost.

Camden County Museum staff found their building forced into and stolen from in the early morning hours of August 8, 2016. Among the items lost, museum worker Kitt Kitterman says they lost a civil war rifle, a WWII era Hawaiian dollar bill, cash and 151 unique arrowheads. In a turn of good news, the museum has now recovered a majority of the items lost.

Sgt. David Stark was given the investigation in October 2016 and has been working diligently since to bring the items home. During his initial investigations, it was determined that two incidents of burglary occurred in the late-night and early morning hours of August 7 & 8, 2016.

The first incident took place through the back door through forced entry, and the second took place through the front entrance by cutting and chiseling the wood around the latch. The knife used to cut the wood was later recovered.

In April 2017, 135 of the 151 stolen arrowheads were recovered. These arrowheads were found at a residence outside of Eldon, having been allegedly traded for automotive repair. The resident who was in possession of the arrowheads was not involved with the burglary of the museum. However, this discovery helped lead Stark to the suspects.

After years of work, Stark was finally able to make an arrest and the two perpetrators pleaded guilty to the burglary in 2018. The two suspects were determined to be Jesse Hansen and Jason Konwinski. Hansen would later also plead guilty to the theft of two Miller County vehicles.

The stolen rifle was found in a mattress near a local Walmart. Stark says it was found destroyed and he says it was determined that the suspects wanted to destroy the rifle and melt it down to find supposed gold within the metal used to construct the item. The arrowheads were suspected to be stolen in order to later sell for cash. Kitterman says that, among the arrowheads, some are over 10,000 years old and all found in Camden County. The arrowheads were recovered in a shoebox.

“This is truly some marvelous detective work,” Kitterman said.

Daphne Jeffries, a leading worker at the museum, says that they never had any idea that they would get these items back. Until Stark reached out to say they had a number of leads on the case, she says the museum workers assumed they were lost forever.

Stark says the case seemed to expand more and more the further he worked on it.

“This case was like eating raw fish, the more we chewed it, the bigger it got,” Stark said.
After years of working on the case, fighting through the court process and finally receiving a guilty plea from the suspects, Stark was relieved to finally be able to return the items to the museum. Stark says that just knowing the items were able to return to where they belong made the whole effort worth the time.

“I wish we could have recovered them all, I really do,” Stark said. “I can’t always promise results, but I always promise effort. In this case here, we got results. I don’t give up. You get a quality dictionary and look up the word stubborn, you’ll see my smiling face.”

The arrowheads will return to the museum collection in due time, as Kitterman says they will need to reorganize everything. Once the COVID pandemic has ended and the museum is back open for business, they will be waiting for eyes to see once more.