Even after 15 years of playing the role of lead guitarist George Harrison, musician Marty Scott never grows tired of it. In fact, watching new generations sing The Beatles music word-for-word as he performs on stage with Liverpool Legends seems to be one of the highlights of his career.

Even after 15 years of playing the role of lead guitarist George Harrison, musician Marty Scott never grows tired of it. In fact, watching new generations sing The Beatles music word-for-word as he performs on stage with Liverpool Legends seems to be one of the highlights of his career.

It all began after a Scott ran into Louise Harrison, the sister of the late George Harrison. Scott was attending a festival where Louise was a guest of honor. The two met and a friendship was formed. At the time Scott was performing as George Harrison with his band from Chicago.

After a couple of years, Louise and Scott started talking about putting a tribute band together and began seeking out musicians that could emulate each character. Once they found the perfect fit, Liverpool Legends was born. Each member bears a striking resemblance to the fab four — John, Paul, George and Ringo.

At first, Louise would travel with them on the road. Scott credits her for opening a lot of doors and paving the way.

Oddly enough, their first show was in Sullivan, Mo. — an eery coincidence that brings back memories of The Beatles American debut on the Ed Sullivan show in 1964. Shortly after the group started to book shows they were approached by someone to bring their talent to Branson, Mo. At the time, Branson was known more for it’s country music scene, not Rock n’ Roll, but they struck a deal with a theater and started playing regularly.

Scott recalls doing five or six shows a week at first, traveling during the weekends outside of the area to different cities. Over time the group learned how to really put on a show, changing costumes that look identical to what The Beatles wore back in the 60s. Scott says each year they plan out a show that features songs The Beatles wrote and covered.

“There are songs that you just have to play like “Hey Jude,” “Twist and Shout,” “I Want to Hold Your Hand…,” Scott says. “70 percent of it we HAVE to play, 30 percent are songs we want to play since we are such fans of The Beatles, too.”

Liverpool Legends is a big hit in international markets. In Mexico City they sell out to a crowd of 10,000. The band travels to countries all over the globe, recently performing in six cities in the Ukraine before making their way back to the Midwest where they’ll be coming to the Main Street Music Hall at Lake of the Ozarks in March.

“The Beatles are bigger today than they were 60 years ago,” Scott says. “Their music still holds up. It’s relevant and there are so many good songs.”

To prove his point, the reissued Abbey Road album last year coinciding with the 50th anniversary of its release, was the best-selling vinyl record of the year and the decade, according to reports. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the release of Let it Be, so expect more songs from that album to be played. Liverpool Legends still runs a show in Branson during the season, which begins in June