At the January 2 Osage Beach Board of Aldermen meeting, a new ordinance passed through its second reading regarding dangerous animals in the city.

At the January 2 Osage Beach Board of Aldermen meeting, a new ordinance passed through its second reading regarding dangerous animals in the city. The ordinance reads as follows:

An ordinance of the City of Osage Beach, Missouri, establishing the offense of keeping a dangerous dog and the penalty and the provision for seizing and destroying the animal and to provide authority to seek a warrant to seize any animal kept, maintained or harbored in violation of Chapter 205 of the Osage Beach Municipal Code.

Though a number of residents came forward during the first reading and introduction of the ordinance at the prior meeting, Mayor John Olivarri says they met no resistance to the second reading. He believes the language of the ordinance is clear and fair, leading to little confusion as to what the city is trying to accomplish.

the ordinance language is in reference to all dangerous city animals, though Olivarri says the main component of this ordinance is for local dogs. He says the ordinance aims to take a fair approach to dangerous animals and does not discriminate towards any breed.

After a first offense by an animal’s owner has been recorded by the city, the second offense will result in a court hearing. Both the owner and whomever was responsible for claiming the offense will be asked to meet in court to state their case. If the animal is then deemed dangerous by the court, the city has authorization to put the animal down. By allowing both parties to speak, Olivarri says the city saw this as a fair due diligence to both sides.

As for what constitutes a dangerous animals, this is comprised of a number of factors. Among the list includes if the animals has bitten another resident or law enforcement member, if the animal is creating a disturbance and more. The owner will be issued a ticket for the first offense and only goes to court on the second offense.

Overall, Olivarri says that it is the goal of the city to complete this process as fairly and humanely as possible. He says the city wants to keep animals and owners safe. The city currently uses social media to find the owners of lost pets to help keep them out of already overcrowded shelters.

“Humane treatment is critical,” Olivarri said.