The second reading of a controversial rezoning proposal drew a standing room only crowd to the Lake Ozark Board of Aldermen meeting with the mayor, once again, called on to cast a vote to break a tie.

The second reading of a controversial rezoning proposal drew a standing room only crowd to the Lake Ozark Board of Aldermen meeting with the mayor, once again, called on to cast a vote to break a tie. 

The proposal was filed by Magruder Limestone and Excavating to rezone approximately 400 acres from commercial to industrial.  To the dismay of those opposed to the rezoning, the final vote was in favor of approving the rezoning. It was a 3 to 3 among the aldermen until Murawski cast the deciding vote.  The rezoning drew fire from nearby residents who are concerned that development of the property will harm their property values, create heavier traffic and result in damage from blasting. 

Magruder’s engineer, Ryan Fuller of McClure Engineering, said changing the zoning would be beneficial to the city and open the property for development. the property was compared to the site where Menard's. That site required a significant amount of blasting and excavating before being developed. 

Fuller said the site holds potential for industrial development such as manufacturing, warehouses, trucking and other uses as well as development what was allowed under the commercial zoning.  

IMcClure told members of the planning and zoning commission that one of the biggest challenges in the lake area is the earth work. It is the single most expensive item to develop and a get a site ready. Fuller said Magrudedr’s rezoning request is a unique opportunity to get the site ready for development. 

The rezoning request falls within the city’s longterm comprehensive plan for industrial development, according to Mayor Gerry Murawski. He said the city needs industrial development to attract industry and commercial development. The parcel of land is going to require extensive earth removal if it is going to be developed. 

Murawski said it is too early to discuss what Magruder intends to do with the property is. He said there has been no application for a permit or any type of plan presented to the city. 

Murawski said he understands the residents opposed to the rezoning are frustrated and worried about the possibility of quarry operations. But at this time, he said, the future plans are unknown. 

Since Magruder attended the meetings and is aware of the concerns expressed by the residents, he hopes they spend some time between now and when they do come back with a plan, visiting with those who were opposed. The mayor would like to see their concerns alleviated or addressed in any future development proposal.