What has been a long-running experience for the staff of the Camden County Museum has finally reached its peak as the building roof has finally been repaired. Starting Monday, Above and Beyond Roofing were at work, stripping away the existing layers of decaying roof material and readying the surface for a brand new roof.

What has been a long-running experience for the staff of the Camden County Museum has finally reached its peak as the building roof has finally been repaired. Starting Monday, Above and Beyond Roofing were at work, stripping away the existing layers of decaying roof material and readying the surface for a brand new roof.

Daphne Jeffries, who has been one of the main Museum leaders working on the project, says she has no idea how much of the roof had to be removed, since the building has been in place since 1931. She says the main factor in this repair is the new sealant that will be added to the roof to contain all of the water leaks that have been plaguing the interior and items inside for months.

Jeffries says the museum staff have been thankful for the large amount of donations they have received towards the repair. She says the total cost of the work is in the area of $20,000, and the donations have gone a long way to help pay that off. Also, Above and Beyond has worked with the museum to put together a payment plan that will ease the burden.

“It’s just wonderful to have such good people work with us in this community,” Jeffries said. “It’s been amazing how much has happened in this last year.”

For a long time, Jeffries said that they weren’t sure if the roof would ever be fixed. Now, with the project completed as of Wednesday afternoon, Jeffries says there is a big sense of relief. The museum will now focus their efforts towards repairing the water damaged areas of the ceiling inside the main theatre room. This process can of course take its time, as it’s mostly cosmetic. However, no more precisely laid buckets will need to be emptied on a daily basis to keep the artifacts within the museum dry.

Jeffries anticipates that the new roof will be in good condition for 20 to 30 years before the next update will be needed. She says that the only item in the museum that was fully damaged was a 48-star American flag. Otherwise, all other items were saved from water damage with the help of the many volunteers.

With a new sense of security in the halls of the museum, Jeffries is happy that the volunteers will be able to worry less about buckets of water and rain and be able to enjoy the museum comforts once again.