It would seem that Akbar is looking for love in all the wrong places, as his quest has been continuous since April. This blue and green bird has become a lake celebrity after deciding to leave home and find a mate during his mating season.

It would seem that Akbar is looking for love in all the wrong places, as his quest has been continuous since April.

This blue and green bird has become a lake celebrity after deciding to leave home and find a mate during his mating season.

Rachel Garmany, owner of Akbar, says they fell in love with him during a Jacob’s Cave Swap Meet in June 2018. She says her husband thought he was “cool looking” and decided to bring him home to live amongst their chickens and ducks. As he has grown and matured, Garmany says they weren’t prepared for his mating need come the following year.

Garmany and her husband have a large enclosure set up for the bird at their home and allowed him to freerange. She says he would always come back at night to sleep, but in April he decided not to. She says that he is looking for a female mate and she doesn’t expect him to come back to their home independently until the normal peacock mating season ends in August. Once he returns, she says they fully intend to adopt a female to keep him around.

The local attention towards Akbar’s various sightings has been humorous to Garmany, as it is mostly lighthearted fun in just seeing a peacock amongst the city streets. She says that she has had MDC and animal control called on the peacock, though they are not able to do anything in their power to catch him in fear of injuring him in the pursuit.

Garmany and her husband to worry about Akbar and want people to know that they care for him deeply. She says that she is more than happy for people to take a picture of him when he’s around, but she says they ask people not to attempt capture as this may lead to injury. Until mating season is over, they just hope he stays safe.

This is Akbar’s second escape, as he did return home once in May and fled again two days later. Garmany says that capturing the bird is harder than it looks, as Akbar is quite large. A community member living on D Road was able to capture Akbar at the end of May, though when the Garmany’s went to retrieve him, he was able to fly over their heads and escape. For now, they hope that he will stay out of trouble and return home in August.

Akar’s name comes from an Indian ruler, which fits him due to his Indian heritage. Garmany says the bird is very spoiled when it’s home, with his favorite food being bananas.