Though much of the Upper-Midwest will see significant winter weather activity this weekend, it appears that the lake area will avoid much of the impact. However, thunderstorms are expected on Saturday, which should be something to watch out for.

Though much of the Upper-Midwest will see significant winter weather activity this weekend, it appears that the lake area will avoid much of the impact. However, thunderstorms are expected on Saturday, which should be something to watch out for. 

The same storm set to bring feet of snow to parts of Arizona and significant snow to the rest of the Southwest late this week will swing onto the Plains and evolve into a blizzard over part of the north-central United States this weekend.

The weekend storm, like the one at midweek, will track toward the Great Lakes. However, the storm this weekend will be significantly stronger.

As a result, the new storm will create heavier precipitation, including snow, and generate significant wind.

"At this time, areas from Kansas to central Nebraska, northwestern Iowa, southeastern Minnesota, northern Wisconsin and northern Michigan have the potential to receive a general 6-12 inches of snow with locally higher amounts," according to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Brett Anderson.

However, a shift in the storm track may occur depending on the storm's exact path as it dips into the Southwest states, prior to turning northeastward.

"The weekend storm is likely to produce blizzard conditions within and surrounding the heavy snow swath," according to AccuWeather Storm Warning Meteorologist Richard Schraeger.

Blizzard conditions may occur, even though precipitation in some parts of the southern Plains may start as rain or ice.

Cities at risk for blizzard conditions include Goodland, Kansas; Grand Island, Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska; Minneapolis; and Eau Claire, Wisconsin.

The storm is likely to bring all or mostly rain to Chicago, Detroit, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Cleveland, St. Louis and Kansas City, Missouri.

Where there is a significant amount of snow on the ground from prior storms and rain falls with the second storm, the risk of urban flooding will be significant.

As colder air rotates around the storm and pushes farther east, a bit of snow may fall on Saturday night and Sunday from northeastern Kansas to northern Illinois.

Lake-effect snow is likely farther to the east on Sunday in southern Michigan, northern Indiana and northern Ohio.

High winds to be problematic with storm

The winds from this storm may become strong enough to knock over trees and cause localized to regional power outages over the Plains and Midwest.

Even outside of the heavy snow area, strong winds will be a problem over the southern Plains during Saturday and Saturday night. Gusts in some areas of Oklahoma, northwestern Texas and Kansas may top 60 mph.

By Sunday, gusts between 40 and 55 mph are likely to blast across the middle Mississippi and Ohio Valley, as well as the Great Lakes region.

The winds will contribute to low-level turbulence for airline passengers and may lead to delays at the major airport hubs even where there is no fresh snowfall.

Snow continues to pile up over part of north central US

The storm from Wednesday has pushed Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport over the top for the snowiest February on record. The prior February snowfall record for Minneapolis was in 1962, when 26.5 inches of snow fell.

Des Moines, Iowa, has received close to 20 inches of snow so far this month. Already, the city has received over 40 inches of snow since early November. The average annual snowfall is 35 inches. Mostly rain is forecast with the weekend storm in Des Moines.

Snowfall is also well above average for Omaha, Nebraska, this season. The average annual snowfall is 26.5 inches of snow, compared to about 41 inches already as of Wednesday morning. Omaha is likely to get a combination of rain, ice and snow. Blizzard conditions may develop on the tail end of the storm.

This system will be strong enough to create conditions conducive to severe thunderstorms to its south. Strong winds, a few tornadoes and worsening flooding can occur in the Southeast this weekend.