Often, out of tragedy or misfortune, we come together as good neighbors should. In our own area, lowlands flooded, basements are damaged and trees have been ripped from the ground with one home destroyed. And neighbors helped neighbors in the aftermath of such disasters or hardships. As it should be.

The immediate Lake of the Ozarks area was spared the tragic floods that most of central and southern Missouri experienced this week. While we've had our share of serious flooding in recent years, our friends to the south and east are baring the brunt of Mother Nature's fury. They have our empathy.

Often, out of tragedy or misfortune, we come together as good neighbors should. In our own area, lowlands flooded, basements are damaged and trees have been ripped from the ground with one home destroyed. And neighbors helped neighbors in the aftermath of such disasters or hardships. As it should be.

We've seen nationally posted videos of men and women, blacks and whites, risking their lives to save a life; we've seen volunteers rescuing their friends and neighbors — or complete strangers — from flooded homes, cars and businesses. It's the human spirit.

In the lake area, we checked on the well-being of our neighbors, or we checked on our absentee homeowners' properties. Some of us may have picked up tree limbs or overturned deck furniture, or removed personal belongings from basements and garages. We heard of one kind soul who removed a log wedged under his neighbor's dock just because it was there.

Our hats off to those who do reach across invisible boundaries to help in times of need. Tragedy tends to bring the best out in each of us, and we hope that spirit of giving continues unabated — regardless of tragedy or triumph, good or bad.

It's the right thing to do.