It's unfortunate that only a handful of voters care enough about their local governments to take 15 minutes out of their day to mark little black squares on a piece of paper.

How sad.

Turnout for Tuesday's general municipal elections was discouraging, at best.

Only 7.6 percent of registered voters in Camden County turned out to vote. That's a paltry 2,217 voters who cared enough to help chart the future of their government. It was hardly better in Miller County with a turnout of 10.63 percent. Morgan County was only slightly better at 11 percent.

What to do, what to do.

This is the same old song, but a different verse. It's unfortunate that only a handful of voters care enough about their local governments to take 15 minutes out of their day to mark little black squares on a piece of paper. Yes, there were only a handful of contests in lake-area balloting, but voters were asked to decide on three issues involving sales or property taxes — something that should be near and dear to all of our pocketbooks.

Regardless of how "hot" the elections are, regardless of who's running for office, regardless of what the ballot issues are, we have an obligation — we have the right and the privilege — to get out and vote.

No excuses.

Equally unfortunate was the low number of offices that had contests. One could deduce that the electorate is satisfied with their representatives in local government. Maybe in some respects, that's a good thing. We're not so sure.

Competition is a good thing whether it's in business or politics.

All of our lake communities face challenges as they continue to emerge from the Great Recession and chart a path to the future. We all should take the responsibility of making our voices heard at the ballot box rather than at the coffee shop.