The November primaries will be here before you know it. Missourians will be voting on multiple ballot measures that could change everything from the gas tax, to minimum wage and legalization of marijuana.

The November primaries will be here before you know it. Missourians will be voting on multiple ballot measures that could change everything from the gas tax, to minimum wage and legalization of marijuana.

Depending on the outcome of an appeal,  Missourians may be able to vote on the proposed Amendment One, Lobbying, Campaign Finance, and Redistricting Initiative. The proposed amendment would make changes to the state’s lobbying laws, campaign finance limits for state legislative candidates and legislative redistricting process.

Late last week a Cole COunty judge  ordered the amendment to be removed from the ballot but the organization sponsoring the amendment has said it would appeal.

Missouri, one of the remaining states to legalize medical or recreation marijuana, will will vote on Amendment 2, the Medical Marijuana and Veteran Healthcare Services Initiative,  on the Nov. 6, 2018 ballot. Secretary of State John Ashcroft announced the ballot will appear on Aug. 2, 2018 – just a few days before the August primaries. 

If the measure passes, Missouri would collect taxes from marijuana sales to provide healthcare services for military veterans. The tax is currently proposed at just four percent of sales. State-licensed physicians would be able to recommend marijuana use to qualifying patients.

The second amendment proposal introduced is the Medical Marijuana and Biomedical Research and Drug Development Institute Initiative. If passed, the measure would legalize marijuana for medicinal purposes and tax sales at 15 percent. Collected revenue would be used to fund a biomedical research and drug development institute in efforts to research and conduct studies on incurable diseases. According to 

Third medical marijuana measure introduced is Proposition C, Medical Marijuana and Veterans Healthcare Services Initiative, Education, Drug Treatment, and Public Safety Initiative. If passed, marijuana sales would be taxed at 2 percent and tax revenue would be spent on veteran services, drug treatment, education and law enforcement. This proposition is expected to bring in 10 million dollars in additional revenue.

Another important issue Missourians will be able to vote on is raising the state minimum wage. Currently, the state minimum wage is $7.85. Proposition B, if voted yes, would increase minimum wage to $12 dollars an hour. The measure would not take place immediately, allowing the state a minimum of five years to adjust he minimum wage to $12 dollars. If Prop B passes, the state minimum wage would increase to $8.60 in 2019, $9.45 in 2020, $10.30 in 2021, $11.15 in 2022 and $12 in 2023. The initiative would also penalize employers who pay below the minimum wage and require the employer to provide the employee with the full amount of the wage rate plus an additional amount equal to twice the unpaid wages. Currently, the state’s minimum wage is .60 cents more than the national wage of $7.25, making Missouri one of the lower wage states.

Missourians will also be able to vote on Proposition D. The main concern Missourians are facing is the potential gas tax increase – increasing the current gas tax by 10 cents per gallon, with revenue from motor fuel tax increase dedicated to the state highway patrol. The proposed 10 cents per gallon, similar to the proposed measure to raise minimum wage, would adjust over five years. In 2022, Missourians would pay .27 cents per gallon after July 1 if Prop D is passed. 

The November election will also allow Missourians to vote on county measures, including offices such as presiding commissioner and prosecuting attorney.