Out on the lawn of the Camden County Courthouse, county residents met Wednesday morning to speak in support of Amendment 1.

Out on the lawn of the Camden County Courthouse, county residents met Wednesday morning to speak in support of Amendment 1.

Benjamin Singer, communications director of the Clean Missouri initiative, says that the goal of Amendment 1 is to increase integrity, transparency and accountability in state government. The Amendment will be available for a vote on the November 6 ballot.

“We want to let people know the facts of Amendment 1 and how it aims to clean up Missouri politics,” Singer said.

Singer says that Missouri has seen its fair share of corrupt politics throughout the state and says it’s time for people to act against it. He says that politicians in Jefferson City take millions of dollars in lobbyist gifts, which in turn hurts honesty and transparency of the position. With Clean Missouri, Singer says they want to promote giving power and a voice back to the members of every Missouri community.

Amendment 1 would put into effect the following points: lower campaign contribution limits for state legislative candidates, eliminate almost all lobbyist gifts in the General Assembly, require that legislative records be open to the public, require politicians to wait two years before becoming lobbyists ensure that neither political party is given an unfair advantage when new maps are drawn after the next census.

At the rally, two community members spoke about their own support points, including John Huhman, a farmer from  Camdenton and Ron Driskel, a retired metalworker from Camdenton. Both spoke in support of the Amendment and asked others to consider the benefits that giving locals voices more power would bring.

Singer says that they have currently gathered over 300,000 signatures throughout Missouri counties in support of the Amendment and will continue to reach out to people until the vote is completed.

“We’re really confident in this,” Singer said. “We know Missourians want to clean up Missouri politics.”