During the 2017-18 school year, Lake Career and Technical Center math teacher Sharon Moehle implemented the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Math Ready course into her curriculum.

During the 2017-18 school year, Lake Career and Technical Center math teacher Sharon Moehle implemented the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Math Ready course into her curriculum. The idea of the course was to take the principles of math that had been taught to students through regular means and apply it to everyday, real-world problems. A year later, Moehle has received the Outstanding Math Ready Teacher award from the SREB.

Moehle has been a teacher for 21 years and has been a part of the Camdenton School District since 2002. She says she wanted to implement the course to give those students who struggled with basic implementations of math a way to look at it in a new light. By allowing them to see these equations and numbers through the scope of real applications, she says they clinged onto these examples much easier.

Among the many versions taught throughout the course, students saw problems such as pouring concrete and visualizing data trends as hurdles to cross instead of simply solving for x. She wasn’t sure initially if the students would take to the new methods, but quickly she realized that it was a success.

“This course saw them use 21st century skills and work together,” Moehle said.

Much of the course is a research-based structure that went design plans to complete. Moehle says she attended a week long training session to become acclimated with the program before giving it out to the students. She attributes much of the success and ease of teaching the course to this program.

In order to test whether or not the course was successful at all, the school administered the Accuplacer exam to students after they took the course, and 88 percent scored at the college level for mathematics. This increase was a major reason for Moehle’s award success and was something she says she’s very proud of.

“88 percent of these students can now walk into community college and use these course results to be placed into a math class aligned to their interest without remediation, saving them time and money,” Moehle said.

There was no application for Moehle to be included in the running for her award. She says she randomly received an email one day announcing her achievement and she says she was immediately humbled and shocked. Part of this was a student survey taken around December, which she says she had no part in. She hoped that the students would relay positive comments on what she had taught so far, and that seems to be the case.

With the results showing proof of the courses success, Moehle has high hopes that she will be able to expand on the course in the future. One advancement that the course will see soon is the implementation of juniors into what was originally just a senior class. This class counts towards a fourth math credit on college transcript applications, which is something she says should be a big favoring factor when getting kids to sign up.

“They’ve done such great work,” Moehle said. “I couldn’t be happier with the results.”