This spring, 21 students from the Science Research program at Camdenton Middle School competed at the Regional Science and Engineering Fair and the Junior Missouri Academy of Sciences competition at Lincoln University in Jefferson City.

This spring, 21 students from the Science Research program at Camdenton Middle School competed at the Regional Science and Engineering Fair and the Junior Missouri Academy of Sciences competition at Lincoln University in Jefferson City. Over 135 middle school students from mid-Missouri competed, and Camdenton Middle School (CMS) students did very well!

The morning competition consisted of students presenting their projects to judges using trifold boards they created. In their respective categories, CMS students earned seven third place ribbons, seven second place ribbons, and seven first place ribbons. Standouts from the morning competition include:

Kurk Wonderly: Earned first place overall in the Environmental Sciences category for his project “Trichloroethylene Contamination.” Kurk drew inspiration for his project from recent news developments describing possible TCE contamination in our local water.

Hayden Patrick: Earned first place overall in the Animal Sciences category for his project “Wasp Relocation.” Hayden studied the decline of honeybee populations, and noticed that predatory wasps may be partly to blame. Hayden researched ways to destroy wasp nests that would encourage the wasps to relocate to another area further away from nearby honeybee hives, without also causing harm to the wasps. Hayden was also in the top nine overall for Best in Show, and was asked to apply to the Broadcom Masters national competition.

Aspen Reeves: Earned first place overall in the Engineering category for his project “Developing a Contra-Rotating Impeller Wheel for Turbochargers.” Aspen drew inspiration for his project from a Russian airplane that uses dual-stacked contra-rotating propellers to fly. Aspen 3-D printed the housing for an automobile turbocharger, and tested his 3-D printed contra-rotating impeller wheel design against a standard turbocharger impeller. His design produced 70% greater airflow into the turbocharger! Aspen also earned third place overall for Best in Show, and was asked to apply to the Broadcom Masters national competition.

The afternoon competition consisted of students submitting a formal research paper and presenting their project orally to a panel of judges. Two CMS students earned “Excellent” ratings, 14 CMS students earned “Superior Ratings,” and four CMS students earned “Highly Superior” ratings. Of the students who competed from area middle schools, six were chosen to advance to the State Missouri Academy of Sciences competition in Rolla; two of these students are from CMS:

Noah Normand advanced to State with his project “The Window and Door Theory.” Noah drew his inspiration from the fact that during a tornado, some students are in hallways while others are in classrooms. Noah created a model of a school building wing, simulated tornado winds in the rooms and hallways of his model, and measured which locations experienced the lowest wind speeds. He tested several combinations of windows and room doors opened and closed.

Nick Faiferlick advanced to State with his project “No Wires Attached.” Nick drew his inspiration from how devastating Hurricane Maria was on the infrastructure of Puerto Rico, particularly that there was such a large population still without electricity months after the storm. Nick’s project investigated the possibility of transmitting electric power wirelessly through the use of oscillators that change the frequency of electricity.

“We are very proud of the accomplishments of all our CMS Science Research students,” stated CMS science teachers Tim Mulford and Amy Larrington.