The City of Osage Beach board of alderman passed a vote March 22 to send notice to city trash services of their intent on discussing changes to the current system. The vote was passed by a 4-2 vote and has already begun transition into the next step.

 The City of Osage Beach board of alderman passed a vote March 22 to send notice to city trash services of their intent on discussing changes to the current system. The vote was passed by a 4-2 vote and has already begun transition into the next step.

Currently, the vote in question was passed to begin research on the pros and cons of having the City of Osage Beach switch to a single vendor trash services rather than allowing multiple to operate in city limits. State statute in this measure requires the city to make a formal announcement to the existing trash services two years prior to any changes.

Jeana Woods, city administrator for Osage Beach, says they are already deep into researching and comparing options for this issue. Staff throughout the city are measuring cost effectiveness, city reach and general job effectiveness of a single trash vendor.

She says it is possible that they will reconvene in July to discuss findings. She says that currently, the city doesn’t have much of a lean in this decision. With so many open factors that play into the system, she says they want to lay out every possibility.

“The only reason we would want to change the status quo is to provide better overall service to the city,” Woods said.

One method of effective measurement is to compare findings to those of neighboring cities in the lake area. She says they will look at cities with a single vendor, examine how useful the system has worked and take into account the general views of the citizens taking part in using the trash services.

Some of the community complaints and worries about the change at prior meetings and forums included the removal of choice for their services. Others applauded the idea, keeping in mind the benefits it would bring to having less heavy trash vehicles on city roads. Woods says the community makes good points all around. She says the city plans to host more forums on the subject to allow community members to voice further opinions on the matter.

Overall, Woods says the goal will be to quantify the workload this change would place on a single vendor. She says the analytics on every aspect are deep and will take time to come to terms with, including total cost and usage of trash services on private roads. She does, however, feel confident in their ability to come to a sound decision.

“We need as much data as possible so that the city can compare apples to apples,” Woods said.