The days of thousands of boats anchored side-by-side, creating a gauntlet where rowdy behavior and water cannon welcomes were part of the weekend party have gone by the wayside. On a busy summer weekend there may be a few hundred boats gathered but on most weekends, only a hundred or so will be gathered in what was known as Party Cove at Lake of the Ozarks.

The days of thousands of boats anchored side-by-side, creating a gauntlet where rowdy behavior and water cannon welcomes were part of the weekend party have gone by the wayside. On a busy summer weekend there may be a few hundred boats gathered but on most weekends, only a hundred or so will be gathered in what was known as Party Cove at Lake of the Ozarks.

The cove’s official name is Anderson Hollow Cove. But for years, it was referred to as Party Cove, a well-known destination for weekend parties during the boating season. The cove is located at the 4-mile-marker on the Grand Glaize Arm of the lake, about 4 miles from the Grand Glaize Bridge, surrounded by the Lake of the Ozarks State Park.

With the decline in attendance, the attention the cove once garnered has also diminished. It was a hot spot that drew the scrutiny of the Missouri Highway Patrol Water Patrol Division.

It’s not just the party that’s gone, the buoys that once lined the cove to slow the thousands of boats coming and going are gone too.

It’s no longer justified to slow traffic in Anderson Hollow Cove on the Grand Glaize Arm to no-wake idle speed, according to Water Patrol Division Director Capt. Matt Walz.

At one time, it was a necessity in Anderson Hollow Cove but now, he said, there’s no real justification. There’s no docks and by law boaters are required to be at idle speed when passing within 100 feet of another watercraft, he said.

Walz said since the buoys have been pulled, there haven’t been any issues.