LOFPD has five of its personnel trained as Surface Ice Rescue Instructors and they are now training the rest of the department to be capable of removing someone from the cold water.
"We have specific equipment meant to limit the amount of further harm to the patient and the responding firefighter," Woodward said.

We've all seen online videos of an individual or animal being rescued by emergency response personnel after falling through thin ice.
Now, Lake Ozark Fire Protection District is expanding its rescue capabilities to include surface ice rescues. A specialized team will be capable of responding properly to a situation on ice and into open water. 
David Woodward, training officer for LOFPD, said many incidents involving people through the ice and into water initially involve an animal like a dog or deer on the ice. The ice is fragile and the animal falls through, then the person tries to rescue the animal and also falls through the ice. 
LOFPD has five of its personnel trained as Surface Ice Rescue Instructors and they are now training the rest of the department to be capable of removing someone from the  cold water. 
"We have specific equipment meant to limit the amount of further harm to the patient and the responding firefighter," Woodward said.
Suits are designed to be quickly dressed and are buoyant and brightly colored. The sled is a device used to spread a rescuer's weight out over a wider surface area and quickly help recover a person without traumatic effects from being dragged or dropped on the ice. 
"When a person's or animal's heart is very cold, it is sensitive to being jostled and can go from a slow rhythm to ventricular fibrillation quickly," the training officer said. "Knowing this, we take extreme care to get that patient buoyant and on the sled quickly to reduce further injury."
LOFPD uses Autumn Lake off Cornet Branch where personnel have easy access and good water depth. The department also uses a small pond on the downstream side of the Iguana Campground.