The $23 million bond issue will be on the April 3 general election ballot for School of the Osage patrons to consider. Sapp Design Architects of Springfield and George K. Baum & Co. investment bankers of Kansas City are already on board, providing board members and school officials with detailed information about bond financing and design options.

The path to holding a bond issue is complex, and the School of the Osage recently took another step in that direction when it hired Nabholz Construction of Conway, Ark., to manage the project — if voters approve the issue in April.
The $23 million bond issue will be on the April 3 general election ballot for School of the Osage patrons to consider. Sapp Design Architects of Springfield and George K. Baum & Co. investment bankers of Kansas City are already on board, providing board members and school officials with detailed information about bond financing and design options.
Nabholz will be the construction manager at risk for the project which involves renovations, upgrades and new construction at all four building locations at the Leland Mills Heritage Campus and the Highway 42 Campus.
Brad Yoder, assistant superintendent of human resources and operations, said an at-risk manager not only manages the district’s construction project and acts a consultant to the district, but also contractually agrees that the project will be completed within an agreed-upon price — Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP). The construction manager assumes some of the financial risk for the project and is “at risk.”  
Superintendent Dr. Brent Depeé said school officials want to expedite the construction process as quickly as possible if the bond issue passes, and with the least disruption as possible to students and faculty. Having Nabholz officials on board now allows them to work with Sapp Design Architects to minimize delays if the bond issue is approved.
Specific contract language will be developed with input from attorneys and school officials for consideration at a future meeting.
"We want to be able to hit the ground running if the bond issue passes," Depeé explained. "We were also able to get some competitive pricing for services that will only be billed to the district if the bond issue is approved."
Four Requests For Qualifications (RFQs) were solicited, and Requests for Proposals (RFPs) were received. Ittner Architects and S.M. Wilson & Company (the Heritage Building remodel manager) were also considered.
Observations of the interview committee in favor of Nabholz included:
•Nabholz came to the top as one of leading CMAR companies in the country
•Strong project staffing recommendations
•Strong digital record keeping program for future reference
•Multiple opportunities for local businesses to be involved
•Curriculum available for students to get involved in the project and see what the construction industry has to offer
•Currently involved in new Jefferson City High School
•CMAR staffing experience that will help with logistics especially with construction at multiple sites at multiple times

Bond issue
If approved in April, the sale of bonds would help finance facility improvements at all four buildings -- and a new, innovative Early Childhood Center for preschool students on the Heritage Campus in Lake Ozark. The center would be located at the former location of Mills Elementary which was demolished several years ago when the Heritage Building was renovated.
The Early Childhood Center, estimated in size at 11,700 square feet, is the core of the proposed bond issue at roughly $5 million.
"In the district's first Strategic Plan, we had Pre-K Readiness as one of our needs and that was five years ago," Depeé told the board in October. "We had 50 preschoolers and two classrooms then. Five years later, we have five classrooms and 100 preschoolers and we're turning applicants down because we don't have the room at Heritage."
There are students in the area being underserved, he noted, and there are no empty classrooms at Heritage as the district has grown in recent years.
He anticipates more growth within the district as residential areas near Fish Haven Road and Rt. 242 develop.