MDNR found TCE in 14 of 23 soil samples, five of 14 sub-slab vapor samples and eight of 13 indoor air samples taken at the building from October 2-4 during a CERCLA Site Inspection.

A new Superfund site has been recommended in Camdenton by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) after claims by former manufacturer employees that trichloroethylene was dumped at a temporary operations facility were verified in sampling results.

MDNR launched a Pre-Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Screening last August after receiving reports from former Dawson Metal Products employees that operations, including the disposal of the volatile organic compound used for degreasing metal parts, were temporarily moved in the early 1970s.

After contacting more former employees, MDNR was able to verify that a fire occurred in July of 1972 and that operations were moved from the manufacturing facility at 221 Sunset Drive — another separate Superfund site that closed in 2012 — to an otherwise unrelated building.

The temporary facility located at 1225 US Highway 54, known at the time as the Cox building and referred to by MDNR as the Dawson Metal Products Camdenton Facility #2, is currently owned by Dickerson Building, LCC, and occupied by Laker Co. which employs approximately two dozen people.

Former employees claimed that the cancer-causing chemical was disposed of out of the back loading dock and onto the ground for approximately one year. MDNR found TCE in 14 of 23 soil samples, five of 14 sub-slab vapor samples and eight of 13 indoor air samples taken at the building from October 2-4 during a CERCLA Site Inspection.

“Soil data results show contamination in the loading dock area, and it did not indicate any current surface exposure threat to human health,” according to MDNR’s summary of the results.

Despite the presence of TCE, the exposure level does not exceed health-based action levels, according to MDNR, although the site has been recommended for entry into the Environmental Protection Agency’s active Superfund site inventory.

“Indoor air concentrations of TCE and other VOCs detected in the DMPF #2 building do not exceed health-based action levels,” according to MDNR’s summary. “The concentrations of TCE in sub-slab vapor in one area of the building, closest to the loading dock, are elevated above sub-slab action levels. This data, along with detection of TCE in the indoor air, indicates that some vapor intrusion is occurring in the building in Rooms 1, 2 and 3 near the loading dock.”

TCE was not detected in two ambient outdoor air samples nor was it detected in any of the 17 private drinking water wells, one public drinking water well and two springs within one mile of the site, according to MDNR.

Further sampling of soil will be needed to determine the full extent of the contamination and additional air sampling will be conducted in January to verify the conditions.