No elected officials were selected for the group which is comprised of former employees of manufacturers who operated at the 221 Sunset Drive location as well as residents who live nearby.

A group of seven Camdenton citizens have been selected by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources to serve on a community advisory team and provide input on remedial efforts related to the city’s trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination clean up.

First discussed at a public meeting on September 28, 2017, the Camdenton Community Advisory Team was officially formed after the department received 20 total applications from interested citizens. The team will have the opportunity to review and respond to proposed remedies and solutions, while acting as a liaison between the community and state agency.

The seven members selected will serve as core members and are currently undergoing advisory team training by MDNR. An additional eight to 13 members, who can participate in meetings and share concerns, are expected to be added after training finishes on Tuesday night.

“At this training, core members will establish group procedures and will conduct organizational and administrative work in preparation for the initial CAT meeting, which will be open to the public, as will all CAT meetings,” according to MDNR’s website.

No elected officials were selected for the group which is comprised of former employees of manufacturers who operated at the 221 Sunset Drive location as well as residents who live nearby. The seven members are: Don Barrett, Dale Bland, Danielle Farson, James Gohagan, Jannea Hazama, Scott Martin and Jerry Rogers.

The group will be tasked with reviewing numerous ongoing and previous investigations related to the volatile organic compound that was discovered in Camdenton’s water supply in the 1990s. For decades, MDNR, former manufactures Dawson Metal Products, Sundstrand Tubular Products Inc., and Modine Heat Transfer, and the City of Camdenton have been assessing the contamination while taking several remedial actions to limit exposure to the chemical that is linked to several cancers.

Current investigations include beneath the former manufacturing facility and in the surrounding neighborhood where monitoring wells have been installed, as well as in residences nearby where 24 homes have been sampled with two requiring mitigations systems to remove TCE vapors. Additionally, the former Hulett Lagoon / Mulberry Well superfund sites are currently being assessed to identify long-term cleanup options.

Two new investigations were launched several months ago at the Camdenton Sludge Disposal Area Site, located at Camdenton Memorial Lake Regional Airport, where toxic sludge was dumped in 1989 following the closure of Hulett Lagoon, and also at the Dawson Metal Products Camdenton Facility #2 Site, located at 1225 US-54 and known as the Cox Building, a temporary operating facility where TCE was alleged to have been dumped in the 1970s.

For more information about the contamination, investigations or advisory team, please visit https://dnr.mo.gov/env/hwp/camdentontce.html