Mary Spencer, director of communication at the Lake of the Ozarks Stop Human Trafficking Coalition, will discuss labor trafficking in the United States on Thursday, November 30 at 6:30 p.m. and its impact on local communities.

Globally, labor trafficking exceeds commercial sexual exploitation by 80 percent in incidents reported. In the United States, the reverse is true — only 20 percent of calls to the National Human Trafficking Hotline are attributed to labor trafficking. That is quickly changing, however.

Mary Spencer, director of communication at the Lake of the Ozarks Stop Human Trafficking Coalition, will discuss labor trafficking in the United States on Thursday, November 30 at 6:30 p.m. and its impact on local communities. Coalition meetings are held the fourth Thursday of the month at St. George Episcopal Church, 423 N. Business Rt. 5, Camdenton.

From sex trafficking within escort services to labor trafficking of farmworkers, the ways humans are exploited differ greatly. Each type of crime has unique strategies for recruiting and controlling victims, and concealing the crime. To disrupt trafficking networks and help survivors, we must be able to accurately identify manifestations of human trafficking within our communities and apply data-based solutions.

Come and learn about the important work and research the Polaris Project has offered to communities across the country on the growing problem of labor trafficking. The Polaris Project runs the National Human Trafficking Hotline, and this is a pivotal place to begin in understanding and halting the spread of labor trafficking in Missouri, and even here in the Lake area.

The Lake of the Ozarks Stop Human Trafficking Coalition is a volunteer organization working collaboratively to increase awareness, identify causes, and support victims of trafficking.

It invites the Lake area community to its monthly speaker program featuring survivors that will share their experiences of trafficking and escape, as well as expert speakers in the fields of psychology, legal issues, law enforcement, medical, and more.

Programs also focus on the causes of sexual exploitation and labor trafficking in the Lake area. For more information, contact Mary Spencer at 573-873-8714.