Located across a cove north and east of the lakefront establishment, the now C-1b Commercial Lodging property will have access via Sunset Drive, though will not be a part of the business' campus.

The rezoning of 14 acres of agriculture land near Backwater Jacks for the construction of nightly rental units was given the final vote of approval Thursday night by the Osage Beach of Aldermen.

Located across a cove north and east of the lakefront establishment, the now C-1b Commercial Lodging property will have access via Sunset Drive, though will not be a part of the business’ campus.

The development plans to encompass 14 acres of a 19-acre tract of land including a 185-foot barrier of undeveloped land on three sides. The fourth side is the cove facing Backwater Jacks and there also a resort in the vicinity.

City Planner Cary Patterson gave aldermen a letter from Police Chief Todd Davis which apparently addressed the question of a possible increase in crime that had been brought up at the public hearing. The letter was not read aloud for the record, but the board did vote in unanimous approval of rezoning request. 

Alderman Kevin Rucker said in the time between Thursday's meeting and the previous meeting on September 7, 2017 when the first reading of the request was held, a citizen in the area wanted to express their approval and satisfaction of the development, but could not be attendance.

“They are very much in support of this development,” he said.

According to the rezoning application, Dennis Reese of 1360 Bagnell Dam Blvd. is the owner of Lakeshore Holdings, and Andy Prewitt of 12 Allen Road in Eldon is listed as the landowner’s representative.

Prewitt and his uncle, Gary Prewitt, are local developers best known for Prewitt’s Point and Backwater Jack’s in Osage Beach; The Shoppes at Eagle’s Landing in Lake Ozark; and Shady Gators and Lazy Gators on Horseshoe Bend.

At the public hearing on Sept. 7, one person spoke in opposition to the request and questioned whether the city had given the proposal the same kind of due diligence as it does on other rezoning applications.

Patterson assured the resident that the city had done its research and had followed prescribed policies, noting that it had been several years since a similar rezoning request had been considered.

The city planned also also said during the public hearing that the development, which calls for between four and eight four-bedroom homes to be built on the 14 acres, must meet established building codes and must pay the appropriate lodging tax for Camden County.

He called the proposed development the “best case scenario” for the topography of the land. 

Additionally, Patterson noted that under Osage Beach zoning rules, the area could accommodate up to 200 single family homes, but because the topography and location posed developmental challenges it isn’t practical nor possible.

“This would allow good use of the property,” he said.