The two parties are hoping to strike a deal that would involve the developer fronting the cost of the water and sewer line expansion to the new business location and later be reimbursed through city sales tax.

A potential, mutually-beneficial agreement between the City of Camdenton and a local developer looking to relocate could spark further infrastructure development and expand city limits.

City Administrator Jeff Hancock, along with City Attorney Phil Morgan and Public Works Director Bill Jeffries, have been in discussions with developer Morgan Bullock over the last three or four weeks regarding a proposal for a voluntary annexation of property contingent upon connecting to city water and sewer infrastructure.

The board of aldermen was first introduced to the discussion in Tuesday night’s regularly scheduled meeting and an agreement will likely be introduced at the next meeting in October after agreeing to the general concept.

According to Bullock, the WinAir HVAC & Plumbing wholesale supplier store located on N. Business Route 5 across the street from St. Anthony’s Catholic Church will be relocating to the northern southwest intersection of Business 5 and Highway 5 and adding electrical supplies sales as well. 

Bullock said he has already engaged an engineer and plans call for a 15,000-square-foot warehouse and showroom in the vicinity of Ozarks Amphitheater and a Missouri Department of Transportation workshop. Plans also include a 2,400-square foot plumbing showroom. 

The two parties are hoping to strike a deal that would involve the developer fronting the cost of the water and sewer line expansion to the new business location and later be reimbursed through city sales tax earmarked for the project.

The concepts of annexation and constructing infrastructure for future growth at the intersections of Highway 5 and 7 were also included in the city’s comprehensive plan and Hancock noted that he has used this approach in the past to assist actual and future development.

By adding additional infrastructure to the area, it could possibly open the door for more commercial and residential development nearby as key water and sewer lines would be built with expansion in mind.

“All of the risk is on the developer. The developer proposes to extend water and sewer collector lines to the city’s area and then dedicate them to the city. This would allow future water and sewer access to future development in the area,” Hancock wrote in a staff memo. “The city would reimburse this cost to the developer by providing 1/2 of both the General and Special Revenue sales tax generated in the annexed area. The city would keep the remaining 1/2 plus the full amount from the transportation sales tax.”

According to Bullock, the business would generate approximately an additional $100,000 in sales tax revenue annually and the proposal under consideration reimburses the developer approximately 37 and a half percent until the infrastructure is paid for and then turned over to the city.

Hancock said Bullock would be responsible for acquiring all easements and the city wouldn’t accept the annexation unless the infrastructure was completely built to its specifications and regulations.

More details about the proposal are expected to be discussed at the next meeting when the contract is presented to the public for the first time.

“I think it would be mutually beneficial,” Bullock commented.