"The withdrawal of this proposed regulation is a victory for all of us," he said. "The proposed Clean Water rule by the EPA was attempting to redefine the Waters of the US into almost every standing puddle of water. It was a very intrusive regulation and would have cost the citizens of the US billions of dollars and had very little positive environmental impact."

President Donald Trump's administration has withdrawn the Obama-era regulation that expanded federal power through the EPA over small waterways, thus removing the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule imposed in 2015.
The EPA's WOTUS rule raised the ire of State Rep. Rocky Miller when it was first issued, and he fought to place the state of Missouri in the best possible position to thwart the EPA's dictates.
"The withdrawal of this proposed regulation is a victory for all of us," he said. "The proposed Clean Water rule by the EPA was attempting to redefine the Waters of the US into almost every standing puddle of water. It was a very intrusive regulation and would have cost the citizens of the US billions of dollars and had very little positive environmental impact."
Subsequently, he filed and passed a bill in the Missouri Legislature to remove WOTUS from the definition of Waters of Missouri, which gave Missourians certainty on what the state needed to protect. The state's definition was well defined and understood by all who dealt with it, Miller said.
U.S. Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-MO) commented on President Trump's rollback of the rule.
This  overreach from Washington would have required farming, home building, business expansions, commercial development and countless other land uses in or near these land features to get a federal permit that could take years and significant resources to obtain, she said. The administration’s withdrawal of this rule rolls back this burdensome and unreasonable federal regulation.
The Waters of the United States expanded EPA jurisdiction of water ways to include all bodies of water – regardless of how small – on both public and private lands. This means the federal government could have gone as far as placing restrictions on and regulating ephemeral drains, ditches and “wetlands” that only contain water when it rains.