“It is hard to find the right words because I love this county and everyone I have had the pleasure of working with and serving,” Burns wrote in her resignation letter. “I have made lifetime friends and have been a part of the lives of many people through their hard times and times of celebration.”

A second elected Camden County official has announced her retirement from public office, effective May 31.

Camden County Collector Vicky Burns, midway through her second term in office, has decided to resign from the position she’s held for the last six years citing ongoing health issues. Before being elected collector, Burns spent 11 years in the office under former Collector Linda Sweatt.

Burns notified the commission with a resignation letter on April 17 and made an informal announcement on Thursday, May 4, before the regularly scheduled commissioner’s meeting. She notified Gov. Eric Greitens’ office shortly after informing the commission of her decision.

“I love this county. I love the people I serve. I love the people I work with. Health-wise, my anxiety this last year with the computer disaster and the tax statements, couldn’t get them out (on time),” Burns told the commission. “I’ve recommended my replacement for the interim, Teresa Murray, which is my chief deputy. She’s been working there longer than I have and she’s very able to take care of it. She’s who I’m recommending but it’s up to the governor.”

Murray has worked in the collector’s office for the last 22 years and was appointed chief deputy by Sweatt in 2005, a position reaffirmed by Burns when she took office.

Burns said before the IT crisis occurred in September 2016, the previous IT department, which was terminated, had been working on an online program for citizens to print off their own tax receipts — a project she’s been working on for three years, she said.

“When that happened, that fell through, the IT guys we had working on it were gone,” Burns said. “It’s getting close, we’ve got Huber & Associates working on it and it’s probably going to be this year. Other counties have it and it helps to cut down on phone calls. I think it’s good for the people to be able to go, it’s public information anyway, to see your neighbor’s taxes, what they’re paying or whatever.”

Camden County Auditor Ronald Capps announced his retirement earlier this week, also citing ongoing health issues. The resignations come on the heels of an approved request by the county commission to undergo a comprehensive audit by Missouri State Auditor Nicole Galloway expected to begin this summer.

Under Missouri State Statutes 49.101, the county commission has the authority to appoint an interim county official for the auditor, clerk and assessor offices until Gov. Greitens appoints someone to fill out the remainder of the term until the next election. It doesn’t appear the commission has any statutory authority to appoint an interim collector.

Burns noted in her resignation letter she would be available, if needed, during the state audit process.

“It is hard to find the right words because I love this county and everyone I have had the pleasure of working with and serving,” Burns wrote in her resignation letter. “I have made lifetime friends and have been a part of the lives of many people through their hard times and times of celebration.”