The Lake Career and Technical Center of Camdenton was pleased to announce a community partnership and the formation of the Allied Health Career Academy, a new career development course set to begin in the 2017-2018 school year.

The Lake Career and Technical Center of Camdenton was pleased to announce a community partnership and the formation of the Allied Health Career Academy, a new career development course set to begin in the 2017-2018 school year.

On Tuesday morning, LCTC Director Jackie Jenkins presented a Memorandum of Understanding between the career academy and several local businesses to offer health sciences students with more opportunities for career training and experience.

“This is about our students and our partners. This MOU we’re about to sign is to formalize the collaboration between LCTC and our many partners, who for some began a long time ago, and for many others, this is a brand new partnership,” Jenkins said. “This MOU commits us to work together more closely toward a common goal, to support our current health science students in experiencing a meaningful, real world experience and to support our future workforce in health care.”

Community partners who signed the MOA on Tuesday included, but is not limited to, Mid-County Fire Protection District, Lake Parke Senior Living, Regional Hospice - Lebanon, Lake Regional Health System, Osage Beach Rehab and Health Care, Phoenix Home Care and Hospice, and State Fair Community College.

The goal of the new career development course is to help young people explore a variety of career choices, offering opportunities for students to gain a unique perspective into various careers dealing with medical sciences.

Jenkins explained that studies have shown students who are interested in their learning and find it relevant to their own goals, tend to contribute more to their own educational volition. There is still a stigma around college degrees and skillful workers, she said, adding that career and technical skills are needed beyond high school, regardless of college education.

A four-year degree is not necessary to be a great, skilled worker, Jenkins said, and it’s important to help students discover potential career paths.

“Together we’re providing our allied health students the opportunity to expand their high school experience beyond the traditional walls of high school,” Jenkins said. “This started as a vision last year and is now a reality thanks to the handwork of our teachers and staff.”