“The County’s financial condition will allow continued funding of essential services and provide for the payment of debt service requirements on existing capital projects,” Capps wrote.

The financial outlook for Camden County in 2017 is favorable with estimated revenue projected at $39,300,000 by year’s end.

That was the conclusion Camden County Auditor Ronnie Capps came to after the 2017 budget was formally prepared and agreed to by the county commission two weeks ago.

“This reflects revenue from sales tax, law enforcement sales tax, as well as collection of various fees, non-agency funds, and grants,” Capps wrote in his 2017 budget message. “The revenues projected should provide a favorable variance when compared to actual revenue at year-end.”

Compared to the 2016 budget, the county budgeted $16,478,772.44 last year for total estimated money available through county income compared to $17,122,858.46 for 2017. The difference being that the county reported $4,891,290.96 in rollover funds from 2015 into 2016 actual and $5,503,100.97 from 2016 to 2017 actual. The total estimated money available is up over $4 million from the 2015 actual numbers.

At the end of 2017, the county is estimating an ending cash balance of $8,005,597.18.

“The County’s financial condition will allow continued funding of essential services and provide for the payment of debt service requirements on existing capital projects,” Capps wrote.

A majority of the departments’ budgets have been budgeted for similar numbers in 2016 and 2017, however there are a few changes worth noting.

In regards to the budget of management information system, the county has budgeted the exact same total as 2016 — $375,143 — but has removed the position of programmer at $56,675 and reduced the assist programmer line item from $113,496 to $34,736. This is likely due to four members of the department being terminated during the IT crisis and Huber & Associates being contracted to handle the information management systems. According to the 2016 actual numbers a total of $316,108.43 was spent last year compared to the $375,143 budgeted for 2017.

The 2017 County Commission budget is up approximately $140,000 from the 2014 actual numbers as Human Resources and Attorney Fees have gone from $0 in 2014 to $41,777.86 in 2015 and $51,852 in 2016. A total of $50,000 was budgeted for 2017. Attorney fees have also gone from $106,647.32 in 2014 to $146,000 budgeted for this year.

The County Clerk’s budget also increased by almost $80,00 from 2015 when the actual budget was $345,229.26 compared to $428,778.96. The most notable increases have been to the Medical Insurance line item up over $7,000 from 2014 and Contracted Services up from $10,245.86 to $36,000. The Clerk’s Office recently had a separate server installed before the IT crisis. Election costs have also increased, up from $63,793.61 to $118,000 in 2017.

The Recorder’s Office budget is up from $303,319.79 in 2014 to $365,554 in 2017. Notable line item increases over the years include medical insurance, equipment repairs, office supplies and overtime wages.

The Road and Bridge Department budget is slightly down from 2016, going from $7,893,300.69 to $7,734,304 in 2017. Almost $600,000 worth of budget requests were denied by the commission. The department requested $1,225,000 in material-asphalt maintenance, but was only budgeted $702,314. A request for $220,000 in additional constriction equipment purchases was also denied. That line item is budgeted at $550,000 compared to a requested $770,000. Road and Bridge was budgeted $500,000 in FEMA disaster relief funds compared to $806,393 in 2016.

The Prosecuting Attorney’s Office budget was also increased by almost $100,000 from 2014. The 2017 budget for the office at $929,873 is approximately $34,000 less than requested. Notable increases over the years include additional salary for assistant prosecutors and office supplies. Almost $47,000 was denied for the legal secretary fund which was budgeted at $168,132 in 2017.