The report does not distinguish between the three types of diabetes — type 1, type 2 and gestational. However, type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diabetes, so the data is most characteristic of type 2.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention publishes reports on the state of various diseases in the United States. The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report includes information on how many Americans have diabetes and the disease’s costs.

The report does not distinguish between the three types of diabetes — type 1, type 2 and gestational. However, type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diabetes, so the data is most characteristic of type 2.

Following are some important findings.

• There were 30.3 million people in the United States with diabetes in 2015. That amounts to 9.4 percent of the population, or nearly 1 in 10 Americans.

• It’s estimated that another 7.2 million people have diabetes and don’t know it.

• There were 1.5 million cases of newly diagnosed diabetes reported.

• Diabetes was the seventh-leading cause of death in 2015.

• There were 84.1 million U.S. adults with prediabetes, a condition characterized by elevated blood sugar that puts people at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. That works out to 34 percent of American adults have prediabetes.

• There were 5,300 kids between the ages of 10 and 19 diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, previously a disease of middle age.

Among adults diagnosed with diabetes:

• 61 percent are obese; 26 percent are overweight

• 41 percent get less than 10 minutes of moderate or vigorous exercise daily

• 16 percent are smokers; 35 percent used to smoke but have quit

• 74 percent have high blood pressure.

• There were 108,000 adult diabetes patients who required a lower-extremity amputation in 2014.

• The total cost of caring for Americans with diabetes in 2012 was $254 billion. That averages out to $13,700 per patient. This cost is more than twice as high as caring for a person without diabetes.

• It is expected that 2 out of every 5 Americans will get diabetes in their lifetimes.

There are multiple risk factors for diabetes; some can be controlled, and some can’t. If you have any of these risk factors, it is a good idea to be tested for diabetes.

• Age 45 or older

• Have a relative with diabetes, especially a parent or sibling

• A history of gestational diabetes or giving birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds

• High blood pressure

• Being overweight or obese

• Being physically active less than three days a week

Diabetes cannot be reversed, but it is possible to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes by making lifestyle changes. With diet and activity changes, it’s even possible to put your diabetes in remission.

Following are the most important changes you can make.

• Lose weight. A weight loss of just 5 or 10 percent can be enough to delay diabetes.

Exercise daily. Muscle cells use glucose during exercise and for several hours afterwards. Cardio burns calories, but strength training is important too.

• Ditch sugar-sweetened beverages. Sugar doesn’t directly cause diabetes, but it does contribute to weight gain. Studies show that those who consume the most sugary drinks have a higher risk of diabetes than those who consume the least.

• Don’t avoid carbohydrates, but do choose wisely. Whole grains and whole fruit help prevent spikes in blood sugar. Know your portion sizes, and keep them in check.

• Monitor your numbers. Keep your blood pressure in a good range, and if you have diabetes, regularly check your blood glucose.