A common criticism amongst these reviews is that Ozark follows too closely to family-crime drama predecessors such as Breaking Bad and Bloodline and takes too long to get to the precipice of the storyline.

From the New York Times to the Washington Post, from Vulture and Uproxx to the Hollywood Reporter and USA Today, seemingly every major news and entertainment outlet has published a preview for the upcoming Netflix drama set at Lake of the Ozarks.

The 10-show first season, filmed in part at the Lake, but mostly in Georgia — stars Jason Bateman of Arrested Development fame, and Laura Linney, a four-time Emmy winner — will be uploaded in full on Netflix on July 21, 2017.

Centering around the world of illegal drug money laundering for a Mexican cartel, Marty Bryde (Bateman) is a financial advising partner at a Chicago firm who moves his family to the Lake of the Ozarks to begin funneling money through local businesses for the murderous criminals. Hoping to escape the pressure of the big city, Bryde hopes to keep a low profile while dealing with a cast of characters described as “criminals” and “con artists.”

“It’s as if the creators raided television’s medicine cabinet and made off with all the amphetamines meant for a year’s worth of other crime shows,” The Washington Post TV Critic Hank Steuver wrote. “The people who live around the lake are seen as backward, racist, homophobic and intelligent only in the criminal sense — all of which could very well be truthy, but not entirely fair.”

“There’s something very familiar about Ozark,” Kelly Lawler of USA Today wrote. “A white, middle-class anti-hero gets involved in organized crime and does terrible things for his family, who in turn do their own terrible things. There’s graphic violence and a strip club, and the whole series seems to be shot through a blue-and-gray filter.”

A common criticism amongst these reviews is that Ozark follows too closely to family-crime drama predecessors such as Breaking Bad and Bloodline and takes too long to get to the precipice of the storyline. 

“Your show needs something special to be worth the bother — particularly when too many shows are demanding too much patience from their viewers, with not enough reward — and Ozark doesn’t really deliver the goods,” Uproxx Senior TV Writer Alan Sepinwall wrote. “It would require sheer brilliance to come out feeling as fresh and untainted as all the money that Marty cleans.”

“Netflix’s new crime drama isn’t the next Breaking Bad or Bloodline. But in the era of Peak TV, it’s hard not to draw comparisons to the prestige TV that came before. Especially one that features drugs, money laundering and a toxic family,” Tampa Bay-Times Staff Writer Chelsea Tatham wrote. “Ozark isn’t anything we haven’t seen before — white dude hides criminal behavior from his family only to sink deeper and deeper into it — but that doesn’t mean it isn’t solid.”