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The Lake News Online
  • Our view: Hasty may be best hope for planning and zoning reform

  • In adversity there is opportunity.

    The race for Camden County Presiding Commissioner was certainly filled with adversity, but now there is an opportunity to set aside differences and move the county forward.
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  • In adversity there is opportunity.
    The race for Camden County Presiding Commissioner was certainly filled with adversity, but now there is an opportunity to set aside differences and move the county forward. It’s easy to focus on the negative and to criticize. That’s been painfully obvious.
    Camden County needs strong, visionary leadership. Personal squabbles are nothing but divisive. Greg Hasty was given a mandate for presiding commissioner with a 17 percent margin of victory. The county has been rife with controversy for several years, and little has been gained.
    With Hasty's win Tuesday, there needs to be an air of confidence in the governmental direction of Camden County. We're optimistic that the outcome will end the stalemate of personality conflicts in the courthouse that has soured the working atmosphere in recent months.
    We're hopeful that Hasty's election will lead to the alignment of ideas and goals between the three commissioners this election has afforded the county taxpayers. It's time to get the county moving in a positive trajectory again. The newly-envigorated spirit of progress can only be a lightning rod for the change the county needs, and we're trusting Hasty to now make good on his campaign promises.
    Hasty's legacy now lies ahead of him. And the people of the county deserve a positive thinker, with progressive ideas and an ability to pull the county together.
    There is usually something to be said for stability in government. With the election of Hasty, the combination of officials now in the commission office may offer a more functioning and fruitful governance beyond the stalemate that currently exists.
    While some may be concerned about Hasty's intentions regarding planning and zoning, he may be Camden County's best hope for reform of the department that has been at the epicenter of controversy for months.
    It seems likely that the issue will now, at the least, get off dead-center. If Hasty holds true to campaign promises, he will gather the professionals of real estate and development to overhaul the master plan and relax current regulations on some of the more technical aspects of the Unified Land Use Code.
    And perhaps in its next variation and implementation of the master plan and land use code, Camden County will finally find a peace with planning and zoning that has thus far proved elusive.
    Let's work together. Let's grow as a county.
     

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