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The Lake News Online
  • My view: College town vs. Horseshoe Bend

  • In the early morning hours of a Saturday or Sunday morning while in college, police lights often invaded my bedroom, the staccato of siren wails interrupting the sound of parties on my block.
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  • In the early morning hours of a Saturday or Sunday morning while in college, police lights often invaded my bedroom, the staccato of siren wails interrupting the sound of parties on my block.
    The next morning, I usually hopscotched over trash, debris and the occasional splatter of alcohol-infused vomit on the sidewalk on my trip to campus, a mere block’s distance from the eastern edge of the University of Missouri.
    Along the street — a veritable congregation of ramshackle homes repurposed into apartment units — doors sometimes stood ajar, the residents forgetting to close them as the drunken stupor set in earlier that morning.
    By my third year on the street, part of a network of roads colloquially referred to as “East Campus,” the situation above repeated itself on a near weekly basis. I’m not one to complain, as my roommates and I threw the occasional loud bash, so I accepted the weekly parties and accompanying collateral as part of the college experience.
    By about 10:30 p.m., the trumpeting of music from some of the houses signaled the beginning of the weekly partying ritual, which sometimes concluded as late as 4 a.m. as the stragglers returned home from a frat party or the diner to satiate the drunken “munchies.”
    One would expect this from a college environment.
    One would not expect this from life in a family-oriented residential subdivision.
    Unfortunately, that seems to be the case for some folks at the end of Horseshoe Bend.
    As the developers of the Gators’ complex on Bittersweet Road seek to add short-term rental facilities for overnight stays near to Shady Gators and Lazy Gators, the plan is meeting an increasing amount of resistance from neighbors.
    Opponents say the existing facilities, not to mention the possible future ones, are creating a unwanted disruption in the neighborhood. They’ve cited bumper-to-bumper parking, garbage strewn about, loud noise and other, more nefarious, behaviors.
    Basically, my street in college.
    Exacerbating the problem is an apparent devil-may-care attitude adopted by the businesses.
    It’s a recipe for a showdown between full-time residents, eager for peace and quiet, and the businesses in the area, looking to create a more diverse product.
    But as the lake area saw last year, businesses can pay the price for disrupting the lives of their neighbors.
    Neighbors of Paradise Restaurant and Bar in Sunrise Beach, unhappy with what they described as unseemly noise coming from the lakeside venue, sought legal action against the establishment.
    Paradise worked to abate the sound coming from the business from permeating the neighborhood.
    Page 2 of 2 - Thankfully, the business and its neighbors seem to have worked everything out.
    The Paradise situation — sans legal action — should serve as a model for how businesses located in a primarily residential area can alleviate tensions and forge a workable solution that allows neighbors to not have their lives impeding while still affording the business the opportunity to turn a profit.
    That might— and in my opinion, should — include the involvement of the Camden. County Sheriff’s Department.
    Horseshoe Bend isn’t a college town, it is a family-oriented neighborhood. There is a reasonable expectation for quiet and for businesses not to interfere in the peace of the lives of residents, who likely moved to the area for the beautiful views of the Lake of the Ozarks.
    Instead, they’re having trouble seeing past the growing trouble in the area. It’s time to address the problem.

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