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The Lake News Online
  • My view: If you're proud, be clear about it

  • This generation is victim to oversharing. Thanks in part to the multitude of social media outlets, the younger generation has been made to feel as if their every move is worth chronicling.
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  • This generation is victim to oversharing. Thanks in part to the multitude of social media outlets, the younger generation has been made to feel as if their every move is worth chronicling.
    My dad once jokingly threatened to post that he sneezed on his rarely-used Facebook page as an ode to the miniscule life details flounced about on the Internet these.
    Thankfully, he refrained from following through.
    People will share just about anything: what they’re eating, what they will eat tonight, every detail from vacation. A girl my age posts every single time she is about to go to sleep and once she awakens — as if the event is akin to Sleeping Beauty waking from an incalculable slumber.
    Unfortunately, not only is oversharing a problem, so too is the awareness of oversharing — as in people know it happens and are quick to judge.
    It’s common practice to criticize others for what they do or do not post.
    One thing I’ve noticed with my peers is a certain distaste for the “humblebrag.” For those unfamiliar, the humblebrag is a self-deprecating stab intended to illicit a response of both awe and sympathy.
    For example, an article in the New York Times used a tweet sent by publicist Jenny Miranda: “Why do men hit on me more when I’m in sweat pants?”
    Another example straight from my Facebook news feed: “Well, I hate delayed flights, but at least I get free Wifi before heading to Mexico.”
    Really?
    Am I supposed to feel bad for you as I sit here in my office and you’re on your way to the beach?
    I’m not.
    There seems to be a misconception that if one turns a positive into a negative, then it’s a negative. Not true. It’s still a positive, just wrapped in a cloak of false modesty.
    Nobody likes a consistent braggart, to be sure, but can’t people be happy for the accomplishments of others?
    We’re to the point where people get grief over expressing happiness, excitement or joy because the expression is seen as bragging.
    Personal case in point: In the past, some of my work has earned awards from the Missouri Press Association. That’s a big deal worth mentioning in my opinion. But I struggle with broadcasting my accomplishment for fear of the bragging backlash.
    I don’t want to see a bragger more than anyone else.
    But I’d rather see genuine pride or genuine happiness than a false sense of it just to avoid the bragging label.
    Page 2 of 2 - If you’re going to be proud, or happy or excited, I think it’s better to be up front about it.
    Shrouding those emotions in self-deprecation, in the end, is sending a message to youth that twisted words and confusing emotions is an appropriate way to community.
    Instead, we should be sending a message that you should just be clear and concise with how you feel.
    If more people approached life like that, can you imagine how much more we could get done?
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