My favorite player in the big leagues today, Carlos Gomez, got in trouble again for playing the game with a Latin flair. After stroking a pitch deep to center, he hung around home plate a little while to enjoy the flight of the ball. After he finally took off running, he made it to third on a triple. If he hadn't lingered in the batter's box, he may have had an inside-the-park home run.


But no matter. In today's hyper-sensitive baseball culture, the pitcher, some Pirate named Cole, was more offended that Gomez enjoyed himself than he was relieved that he didn't score. He swore at Gomez as Carlos slid into third. You can hear it on the tape. And Gomez went after him. As well he should have. 


Gomez plays baseball with elan. More power to him. Baseball is a game.  Baseball players are entertainers. Babe Ruth understood it. Mark Fidrych understood it. Kirby Puckett understood it. Players today, however, are, oddly, etiquette fundamentalists. If you break some sort of unwritten rule, usually by playing with a bit of panache, the ultra-sensitive have to get their revenge. 


What players should realize is that the more who play like Gomez, the more everybody profits by baseball becoming more entertaining, more flashy, more bigger-than-life. Fans are sick of watching a four-hour chess match. They want action. They want personality. They want drama. 


Gomez gives them all three. All hail Carlos Gomez, who the Twins should never have traded. 


My favorite player in the big leagues today, Carlos Gomez, got in trouble again for playing the game with a Latin flair. After stroking a pitch deep to center, he hung around home plate a little while to enjoy the flight of the ball. After he finally took off running, he made it to third on a triple. If he hadn't lingered in the batter's box, he may have had an inside-the-park home run.

But no matter. In today's hyper-sensitive baseball culture, the pitcher, some Pirate named Cole, was more offended that Gomez enjoyed himself than he was relieved that he didn't score. He swore at Gomez as Carlos slid into third. You can hear it on the tape. And Gomez went after him. As well he should have. 

Gomez plays baseball with elan. More power to him. Baseball is a game.  Baseball players are entertainers. Babe Ruth understood it. Mark Fidrych understood it. Kirby Puckett understood it. Players today, however, are, oddly, etiquette fundamentalists. If you break some sort of unwritten rule, usually by playing with a bit of panache, the ultra-sensitive have to get their revenge. 

What players should realize is that the more who play like Gomez, the more everybody profits by baseball becoming more entertaining, more flashy, more bigger-than-life. Fans are sick of watching a four-hour chess match. They want action. They want personality. They want drama. 

Gomez gives them all three. All hail Carlos Gomez, who the Twins should never have traded.