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The Lake News Online
  • Students “Skype with Mike”

  • Fifteen minutes before 9 a.m. on Friday morning, School of the Osage High School's auditorium was filled to the brim with students. Talk of weekend plans and the latest gossip filled the air as administrators worked behind the scenes to set up a Skype call, but this wasn't just any call. The entire student body was about to talk to Astronaut Mike Hopkins, an Osage alum, during what the school called 'Skype with Mike.'
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  • Fifteen minutes before 9 a.m. on Friday morning, School of the Osage High School’s auditorium was filled to the brim with students. Talk of weekend plans and the latest gossip filled the air as administrators worked behind the scenes to set up a Skype call, but this wasn’t just any call. The entire student body was about to talk to Astronaut Mike Hopkins, an Osage alum, during what the school called ‘Skype with Mike.’
    Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Mike Hopkins took questions from students in a web cast that was live streamed on NASA TV. Both are crew members of Expedition 38 and have been on the International Space Station since September.
    Students submitted questions in their science classes and 24 were chosen to speak directly to the astronauts. They were asked everything from ‘Do you feel like Superman flying through the air while pushing off the walls?’ to ‘If you had the chance, would you bring someone in space with you?’
    According to NASA, “Linking students directly to space station astronauts provides them with an authentic experience of space exploration, scientific studies and the possibilities for future human space exploration. NASA activities have been incorporated into classes at the schools in preparation for these conversations.”
    The Osage students were not the only ones who had the opportunity to speak to the astronauts. Students from Temple University spoke to Hopkins, Mastracchio and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata on Thursday.
    In a press release, NASA added, “These in-flight education downlinks are part of a series with educational organizations in the United States to improve science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), teaching and learning. It is an integral component of NASA's Teaching From Space education program, which promotes learning opportunities and builds partnerships with the education community using the unique environment of space and NASA's human spaceflight program.”
    To hear how Hopkins and Mastracchio answered the students questions, check out a video on LakeNewsOnline.com.
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