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The Lake News Online
  • County forecasts future after $1 million in damage

  • On the day that one county continues their Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) assessments, a neighboring county is thinking ahead to recovery.
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  • On the day that one county continues their Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) assessments, a neighboring county is thinking ahead to recovery. Camden County Presiding Commissioner Kris Franken continued to host emergency management officials around the county on Wednesday. After touring Linn Creek and southern parts of the county including Richland and Stoutland on Tuesday, the group took a look at the Linn Creek Industrial Park, a section of Y road, businesses in Osage Beach, parts of Horseshoe Bend, Camdenton and Sunrise Beach on Wednesday.
    After seeing heavy rain and flash flooding earlier in August, Camden County and Miller County are hoping for government assistance.
    According to Miller County Commisssioner Brian Duncan, FEMA and SEMA officials were also in Miller County on Tuesday. Duncan said that one representative from SEMA, two from FEMA and one official from the environmental team toured the county.
    The recent visits are for officials to survey the flood damage and to figure out if the state as a whole sustained enough damage to qualify for federal assistance.
    "They are basically trying to get a basic overview of what the damage is to see if we qualify for presidential declaration," Franken said of the recent visits.
    Camden County does not have a total damage estimate to release. Duncan estimates that Miller County saw about $1 million worth of damages.
    Duncan also said that about 40 percent of the bridges and low water crossings in Miller County were affected and are in need of significant repair. At least three of those structures need to be replaced completely. According to Duncan, 60 percent of the county's culvert pipes have damage and many road surfaces through-out the county were washed away.
    If Miller County does not get federal aid, the repair will affect day-to-day operations.
    "It is really going to hurt our everyday maintenance," Duncan said. "When we are trying to do repairs, we can't do everyday maintenance."
    If the funds do not become available, Duncan said that the county may have to budget for the repairs next year and prioritize what needs to be done.
    "It will just take time," Duncan added.
    The counties could wait weeks to hear if they qualify. Lake Sun will update residents on the status of government assistance for flooding damage as soon as the information is available.

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