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The Lake News Online
  • Health and wellness: Eat your veggies at every meal

  • The current USDA MyPlate recommendation is to make half your plate fruits and veggies. When you look at your plate, do you get plenty of vegetables?
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    • Learn to can your vegetables
      Learn to can your vegetables

       

      The University of Missouri Extension will be offering multiple sessions on food preservation and canning this summer. To make t...
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      Learn to can your vegetables
      Learn to can your vegetables
       
      The University of Missouri Extension will be offering multiple sessions on food preservation and canning this summer. To make the most of your garden’s delights, it is important to have up-to-date food preservation information.
      Processing fruits and vegetables using outdated methods may not give you the best quality and may be unsafe to eat. The USDA and University of Missouri Extension are credible sources to provide information on food preservation to consumers.
      The sessions will provide information on how to can salsa and how to pressure can vegetables. Each class will include a hands-on demonstration and MU Extension guide sheets with recipes will be available for all participants.
      The classes will be held at the Community Christian Church, 1064 N. Business Route 5 in Camdenton. Please call the Camden County MU Extension Office to register for the sessions at 573-346-2644.
      The class dates are:
      Boiling water canning of salsa – Tuesday, July 23 from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.
      Pressure canning vegetables – Tuesday, August 13 from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.
      The cost is $15 per person per class to cover food preservation handouts and supplies. Registration is required at least two days before the date of the class session. Please call the instructor, Melissa Bess, at 573-346-2644 or email bessmm@missouri.edu if you have questions. University of Missouri is an equal opportunity/ADA institution.
       
  • The current USDA MyPlate recommendation is to make half your plate fruits and veggies. When you look at your plate, do you get plenty of vegetables?
    Seasonal vegetables will be the best prices and best quality. Bell peppers, cucumbers, eggplant, garlic, green beans, okra, onions, potatoes, summer squash, sweet corn, and tomatoes are in season. Stock up on those veggies and add them to your recipes for fresh taste and many nutrients.
    The amount of vegetables needed in one day varies by age and gender. In general, guidelines for daily vegetable intake are:
     
    2-3 year olds – 1 cup
    4-8 year olds – 1 ½ cups
    Girls 9-13 years old – 2 cups
    Girls 14-18 years old – 2 ½ cups
    Boys 9-13 years old – 2 ½ cups
    Boys 14-18 years old – 3 cups
    Women 19-50 years old – 2 ½ cups
    Women 51+ - 2 cups
    Men 19-50 years old – 3 cups
    Men 51+ - 2 ½ cups
     
    These are general guidelines; those who are more physically active may need more than this amount. One cup of cooked, raw, or vegetable juice will count as one cup from this group. The only difference is that you need 2 cups of raw, leafy greens to count as one cup of vegetables.
    Here are some tips to help you get more vegetables at breakfast, snacks, lunch, or dinner:
     
    Make a veggie omelet or frittata made with veggies for breakfast
    Enjoy a breakfast pizza with lots of seasonal veggies
    Eat some of last night’s leftovers and add some raw veggies
    Snack on raw veggies with homemade Greek yogurt Ranch dip
    Load up your crockpot with your choice of veggies and meat
    Spray veggies with olive oil and parmesan cheese and roast in the oven or grill outdoors
    Keep leafy greens and other veggies you like to make a quick salad for any meal
    Add veggies to pasta sauces, meatloaf, casseroles, lasagna, or rice dishes
    Add shredded carrots, lentils, beans, or onions to your meat to stretch it further
    Choose a vegetable as your side dish instead of a starch
    Add more beans to your recipes
    If you have questions or ideas for future articles, please contact Melissa Bess, Nutrition and Health Education Specialist with University of Missouri Extension. Call the Camden County Extension Center at 573-346-2644 or email Melissa at bessmm@missouri.edu.
     
    Page 2 of 2 - Melissa Bess is a health specialist with the University of Missouri Extension. She is also the author of a health and wellness blog on www.LakeNewsOnline.com.

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