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The Lake News Online
  • Rain garden spruces up old welcome sign

  • Volunteers with the Lake of the Ozarks Watershed Alliance planted a two-tiered rain garden at the old Welcome to the Lake of the Ozarks sign at the junction of Bagnell Dam Blvd. and Osage Beach Parkway.
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  • What's going on
    Volunteers with the Lake of the Ozarks Watershed Alliance planted a two-tiered rain garden at the old Welcome to the Lake of the Ozarks sign at the junction of Bagnell Dam Blvd. and Osage Beach Parkway.
    LOWA established the tiered rain garden to demonstrate one of many ways compost socks can be used to help reduce the amount of stormwater runoff reaching the Lake. Runoff brings many contaminants into the Lake and the deep roots of rain garden perennial plants can help capture some of that runoff.
    Who helped
    Caroline Toole, Kathy Fayant, Joann Billington, Winnie McKinley, Lauri Peterson, Bob Taylor and Karen Robertson all leant a hand in the work. Some volunteers are Missouri Master Naturalists from the Lake of the Ozarks Chapter, some are Missouri Master Gardeners, and some volunteers are both.
    All of the volunteers are part of LOWA's Trained Volunteer Evaluator program. Paradise Landscaping installed the two rain garden walls and filled the beds with soil. LOWA and volunteers donated the plants, designed the rain gardens and organized the planting day.
    Volunteers also cleared out weeds and prepared the beds for planting in addition to planting all the beds, slope and walls.
     
    About the garden
    The tiered garden was built with compost sock walls.
    Plants grow right in these living walls, which in this case were planted with purple poppy mallow across the top, sedum in the face and passion flower at the base.
    The beds of each tier were planted with a variety of Missouri native perennial wildflowers such as white beardtongue, various cone flowers, lanceleaf coreopsis, blue indigo and golden alexanders. The garden also showcases a redbud tree and some aromatic asters were planted on the slope behind it. Perennial plants take some time to establish roots and grow before blooming, so many of the flowers planted in the rain garden won’t bloom until next year.
     
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