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Health, food and wellness from MU Extension Specialist Melissa Bess
Garlic Day
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About this blog
By Melissa Bess
My name is Melissa Bess. I am a Nutrition and Health Education Specialist with University of Missouri Extension. This health and wellness blog started as a way to help improve MU Extension faculty and staff wellness but has grown to a much larger ...
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MU Extension Health and Wellness
My name is Melissa Bess. I am a Nutrition and Health Education Specialist with University of Missouri Extension. This health and wellness blog started as a way to help improve MU Extension faculty and staff wellness but has grown to a much larger audience. Follow me, share with others, bookmark this page, leave comments, and enjoy.
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April 23, 2014 11:18 a.m.
April 19, 2013 5:34 p.m.

Today is known as Garlic Day. Do you use this tasty addition to your recipes?
There may be a relationship between garlic and lowering total cholesterol and triglycerides, while also raising good cholesterol (HDL). Garlic dates back thousands of years to ancient cultures.
Garlic is usually planted in October (will be ready in late June or early July) or in very early spring (to be ready in the fall). It usually takes 9 or 10 months from the time of planting to have a crop.
Garlic is an inexpensive way to add flavor to almost any dish. It can be stored for up to three months in a cool, dark location. Do not freeze or refrigerate unpeeled garlic.
For a stronger garlic flavor, mince or chop the garlic very finely and put into dishes near the end of the cooking time. The smaller the garlic is chopped, the stronger the flavor will be.
For a lighter garlic flavor, add whole cloves while cooking and remove just before serving. The longer they cook, the less flavorful they will be.
If you don't have fresh garlic, you can substitute dried garlic, but the flavor will not be near as good. For 1 clove garlic, you should use 1/8 tsp garlic powder.
Garlic can be roasted, frozen, dried, or stored in wine or vinegar, or stored in oil (with extreme caution). The University of California Davis has information and instructions on all of these techniques in their publication Garlic: Safe Methods to Store, Preserve, and Enjoy.
If you have researched the health benefits of garlic and believe you want to try a garlic supplement, may sure you talk to your physician and/or pharmacist before adding it.

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