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The Lake News Online
  • A new part of the voting process

  • When voters in Camden County headed to the polls on Tuesday, they noticed something new. No more bulky voter books, laptops, cords or printers. Instead an iPad.
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  • When voters in Camden County headed to the polls on Tuesday, they noticed something new. No more bulky voter books, laptops, cords or printers. Instead an iPad.
    The Camden County Clerk's office has received their election equipment from a Clinton, Mo. based vendor for about 25 years. The vendor recently replaced the laptops that the county was using for iPads for no cost increase. The equipment was originally purchased with grant money.
    The new technology streamlines the process and experienced very few glitches during election day according to Camden County Clerk Rowland Todd.
    "These things are so nice," Todd said of the iPads.
    When voters entered a polling location, they were asked to show either their driver's license or voter identification card to the poll workers. The worker would scan the card and the voters information would immediately appear. Todd did say that election workers figured out that driver's licenses scanned easier than voter identification cards, but got a handle on that small issue quickly.
    Every registered voter's name and information was in the system already. Once a name was pulled up, poll workers knew if they were meant to be at that location or not. They also knew which ballot the voter needed. Some locations had up to five different ballots for voters depending on where they live.
    Throughout election day, poll workers seemed excited about the technology change and told a Lake Sun reporter that the process was much faster and smoother with the new iPads.
    For veteran poll worker Judy Taylor, the new technology not only was easy throughout the day but also made for a quick set-up time.
    "It makes the election judge's job so much easier," Taylor said.
    During the April 2 election, Taylor served as the Republican supervisory judge at the Macks Creek precinct. In years past, Taylor recalls having to get to the polls at least an hour before open time to set up. With the iPads, all workers had to do was turn it on and they were read for business.
    "It worked very well. We had no glitches," Taylor added.
    She also said that all voters were accepting of the new technology and did not complain once.
    "Overall, I think it went good," Todd said about April 2.
    A total of 23 percent of voters in Camden County turned out to vote in contrast to the usual 10 to 15 percent of voters who usually vote in an April election.
     
     
     
     

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