In 1941, the Camdenton High School Tigers were crowned Class B basketball state champions. Of the starting five on this team only one was a native of Camden County, Wallace Roofener. The other players transferred into the Camdenton School District from other districts in Missouri. At the time, MSHSAA had few restrictions concerning the transfer of athletes from one school to another. One of these transfer student athletes who came to Camdenton for his senior year was one extraordinary basketball player: Brooks Chambers.


In 1941, the Camdenton High School Tigers were crowned Class B basketball state champions. Of the starting five on this team only one was a native of Camden County, Wallace Roofener.

The other players transferred into the Camdenton School District from other districts in Missouri. At the time, MSHSAA had few restrictions concerning the transfer of athletes from one school to another.

One of these transfer student athletes who came to Camdenton for his senior year was one extraordinary basketball player: Brooks Chambers.

In 1941, Missouri did not select players to all-state teams.

But at the conclusion of the state tournament Chambers was selected as a member of the all-tournament team along with two other members of the Camdenton squad.

At 5’ 10” he was the smallest of the starting five.

He was extremely fast, a gifted ball handler, quick to the basket and scored 17 points in the final game against a very talented Rogersville team.

Back then, there was no such thing as a one-handed set shot or jump shot in high school basketball.

Some college players were using one-handed shots from distance, but this trend had not filtered down to the high school players. All of Chambers' scoring came off of two-handed set shots and driving layups.

Since this gifted player only attended Camdenton High School one year, most people in Camdenton never got to know him and didn’t realize that he held the single-game Missouri high school scoring record. 

Playing for Jamestown High School vs. Olean (at Clarksburg), Chambers scored 87 points.

During this period of time, the game of basketball was a low-scoring affair and it was not unusual for a team to win a game and not score 20 points.

An interesting fact concerning this particular scoring feat was that the game was played in November 1938 when Brooks Chambers was in the tenth grade.

Oh, and one other item of interest, this effort was achieved during an era when quarters consisted of six minutes rather than the current eight-minute quarters.

Chambers currently holds the third-highest scoring game record.

One player scored 93 points in 1955 and another individual scored 92 points in 1953. These records can be found on the MSHSAA website.

Aubrey Brooks Chambers died February 3, 2009, at the age of 87 years. He is buried in the City Cemetery in California, Mo.

To quote the late Paul Harvey, “And now you know the rest of the story."

Bill Smith is a Camdenton High School alum who was a member of the school basketball teams in the 1940s. He now lives in Oklahoma.