Like many lake residents, June and Dick Halsor of Sunrise Beach, are transplants from a northern location. They began their lake journey in 1975 by placing a small mobile home on a somewhat steep and rocky lakeside lot. Years of family fun at the lake led them to build a home on that lot in the 1990’s.

In 1997, they started to tame their yard with planned landscaping. They decided to do the job themselves with limited help from a landscaper. That effort has rewarded them with a gorgeous and lush park-like setting.


Like many lake residents, June and Dick Halsor of Sunrise Beach, are transplants from a northern location. They began their lake journey in 1975 by placing a small mobile home on a somewhat steep and rocky lakeside lot. Years of family fun at the lake led them to build a home on that lot in the 1990’s.
In 1997, they started to tame their yard with planned landscaping. They decided to do the job themselves with limited help from a landscaper. That effort has rewarded them with a gorgeous and lush park-like setting.
This month the Lake Bloomers Garden Club honors the couple with the club’s Yard Recognition Award.
As with most couples, yard “duties” are divided. June’s forte is the gardens and Dick manages the lawn. In 1997 when serious landscaping work began, June’s vision was to keep the area natural and woody looking. The house sits close to a private road, and 95 percent of the yard faces the lake.   
This lakeside setting already had some natural rock ledges, so extra large boulders were brought in to complete the look. The yard was divided into several large beds and grassy areas. June transplanted woodland ferns from a nearby forest floor. She also transplanted area rocks to outline each garden plot. Then she began the job of adding a variety of shade perennials and shrubs to each area.
There are many textures, shapes and heights to her perennial beds. One large bed of hostas has a spot of sun on the lakeside perimeter, a perfect place for several bright red Knock Out roses. Unlike most garden areas, June doesn’t plant any annuals - in keeping with the natural woodland look.     
Then in 2004, with lawn and garden well established, the septic system had to be replaced.  This meant digging up most of the lake front area.  Many of the plants had to be dug up and moved to a “holding bed." As workers and equipment tore into the yard, June asked them not to haul away the many rocks that popped to the surface.  
After the septic was in and workers were gone, Dick and June started the re-landscaping work.  
June used the additional rock to make new beds while Dick established a new lawn. The construction project gave Dick the opportunity to have additional soil brought in.  Since the lawn is shaded, Dick used a five-seed fescue blend.  As his yearly maintenance plan, he puts down lime once a year, uses a weed and feed, fertilizes three times during the season and over-seeds every fall.  
June’s maintenance plan is to use mulch in the beds to keep down the weeds and to hold moisture. Since there is no easy access to the yard, bulk mulch cannot be used so bags of mulch must be carried down to each of the garden areas.
The beauty of the yard extends to the various decks. Dick and a few local friends built several decks that lead down to a lakeside sitting area.
At first June tried many different flower and plant combinations for these decks. She now has a selection that works for her location. For deck containers, she mainly uses impatiens, geraniums, sweet potato vine, vinca, spikes and coleus.
The containers are placed in either sunny or shade locations depending on the type of plants used. She mixes her own container soil using 2 parts potting soil and one part processed cow manure.
In addition to the many deck containers, clematis covers the deck support system and spills over the railings.      
June winters over her geraniums, asparagus plants, Boston ferns and spikes in the attached garage. She is particularly proud of a spike that now stands as tall as a small tree. Because it takes up so much room in the garage, she ties the fronds together during winter storage. She says that it is very important to resist the temptation to water these items during the winter months. The plants must go dormant; then she begins watering in early March.
June will be honored on June 13 at The Lake Bloomers Garden Club members’ tour.
Lake Bloomers Garden Club meets the second Wednesday of the month (except Januar and February).  
For more information, contact Katie Sturtridge at katiesturt@gmail.com.