Consumers aren't the only ones who feel the strain on their budgets when they fill up at the pumps. With gas prices on the rise and expected to continue to inch upwards, Camden County officials are taking a hard look at what the trends are doing to the bottom line.


Consumers aren't the only ones who feel the strain on their budgets when they fill up at the pumps. With gas prices on the rise and expected to continue to inch upwards, Camden County officials are taking a hard look at what the trends are doing to the bottom line.

The fuel budget for the Camden County Road and Bridge Department was already on the low side in the 2012 budget, according to Presiding Commissioner Kris Franken. 

He said increasing prices will only make it worse. If the increase in fuel prices continues, Franken said the county will have to take a look at the budget.

"We will probably have to move money from other line items to cover the increased cost of fuel," he said. "All of the county fuel is bought in bulk and distributed through the fueling facility at the road and bridge south shed." 

To monitor the fuel consumption, each county vehicle has a coded card (key) and the appropriate department is charged monthly for the actual cost of the fuel that they use. The road and bridge department purchases all of the county's fuel in bulk. Each county department then reimburses the road and bridge budget for the fuel they use.
The departments with the highest amount of fuel consumption are the Camden County Sheriff's Department and the road and bridge crews.

Based on the 2012 budget, the total fuel and oil budget for the sheriff's department, including operations, corrections and E-911 is $209,000.  The total fuel and oil budget for road and bridge is $407,500.

According to the latest national gasoline prices across the U.S continue to increase.  The national average is currently at $3.70. Prices range from $4.29 per gallon in California. In other states, like  Alaska and Hawaii, the price is running in the neighborhood of $4 and about 5 cents cheaper in many of the eastern states.

The Oil Price Information Service said that pump prices should increase by another 5 to 10 cents in coming days to reflect price hikes last week in wholesale markets. The national average could hit $4.25 a gallon by late April, OPIS chief oil analyst Tom Kloza said.