The developer of a proposed storage facility on Duckhead Road had to defend his plans from opposing residents at a public hearing that was recently held. The public hearing was held before the Camden County Planning and Zoning Commission, which will decide the fate of the rezoning request from R-1 to B-1 and a Conditional Use Permit.


The developer of a proposed storage facility on Duckhead Road had to defend his plans from opposing residents at a public hearing that was recently held. The public hearing was held before the Camden County Planning and Zoning Commission, which will decide the fate of the rezoning request from R-1 to B-1 and a Conditional Use Permit.

Paulette Navarre filed the two requests on a 9.6 acre tract of land on Duckhead Road and Bruce Road, in Lake Ozark. Navarre wants to build high-end, eco-friendly storage units on 4.4 acres closest to the road.

An attorney speaking on behalf of Navarre at the public meeting explained that it would cost more than $1 million to excavate the land because of a steep slope towards the lake, and develop it into single-family housing. On top of that, the additional houses would add traffic to the road and other additional strains on infrastructure, such as water, electricity and schools.

The attorney, Mark Epstein, said that the developer wanted to put money into the land by developing it without additional burden to the community. Building homes, he said, would add more vehicles traveling regularly on Duckhead Road, noise and neighbors.

Epstein presented letters to the Commission saying the developer would help cover the costs of extending water lines and building a fire hydrant close to the property, which surrounding neighbors would all benefit from, he said. Another letter was from an appraiser saying a new storage facility would have little to no impact on property values.
Residents on Duckhead Road weren’t impressed with the presentation, however.

Steve Weber drove all the way from Des Moines, Iowa, just for the commission meeting, he said. His second home is adjacent to the proposed storage units.

Weber said he spoke to a number of realtors who all agreed that his property value would lower if the land was developed as proposed.

Weber is also concerned about trash flying onto his property and the security of his house.

Other residents who spoke in opposition at the public hearing feared the developer would come back to the commission later asking for the remaining acres of the land to be developed.

“There are very creative contractors who can put anything anywhere,” a resident on Willow Ridge Road said.
The remaining acres of land are waterfront and at the bottom of a 12 percent slope.

The developer agreed with all of the commission’s expectations that the zoning and conditional use permit would be tied together.

“We’re not afraid,” Epstein said. “I represent a client that doesn’t pull shenanigans.”

The Planning and Zoning Commission will take a vote at its meeting in March. The Camden County Commission will make the final vote.