Time is running out for anyone who wants to file an opinion with the Fedearl Energy Regulatory Commission about Ameren Missouri's proposal to change the boundary lines around Lake of the Ozarks.


Time is running out for anyone who wants to file an opinion with the Fedearl Energy Regulatory Commission about Ameren Missouri's proposal to change the boundary lines around Lake of the Ozarks.

FERC will contiue to take comments until March 5. The comments will be taken into consideration prior to any decision being issued. There is no timeframe for a decision from FERC.

In the meantime, many property owners around the lake are concerned about their property rights.

Ameren Missouri officials filed an amended shoreline management plan with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that the utility company believes will solve any property boundary disputes on the shores of the Lake of the Ozarks.

The new shoreline management plan that Ameren filed sets the lake's project boundary, a small strip of land along the shoreline that a reservoir operator holds legal rights to, at 662' above sea level. In cases where an existing house sits below 662’, the boundary shifts below 662' to accommodate the structure.

A FERC order issued in July, 2011 created the perception that approximately 1,200 lakefront homes sit on property that Ameren would legally control in order to operate and maintain the lake. FERC found that an initial draft of the plan declared more than 4,000 structures as "non-conforming."

FERC raised concerns about encroachments and blamed Ameren Missouri.However, Ameren Missouri had proposed a similar boundary change to FERC several years ago and the fedearl agency opted to not take any action.

"Under both its current license and its previous license from the mid-1980s, Ameren has had a longstanding obligation to prevent the construction of unauthorized structures inside the project boundary, otherwise known as encroachments, and to take appropriate action to ensure that neither project purposes nor the expectations of the structure owners were unduly affected," a FERC statement published in November declared. "Over many years, Ameren failed to carry out this obligation. Ameren’s repeated failure to properly implement the terms of its license has allowed matters to get to the point where it does not even know exactly what structures have been built within the project boundary and whether they were authorized.

FERC recognizes that Ameren’s failures have left local property owners in an extremely difficult position."
There is no deadline for FERC to make its decision on the new shoreline boundary.

FERC holds authority over hydroelectric projects across the nation that are not controlled by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.