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The Lake News Online
  • Hurricane Deck Bridge bid approved

  • As plans have firmed up, the replacement of the Hurricane Deck Bridge has changed. The new bridge located on Highway 5 at the south end of Sunrise Beach will be completely new, though an alternate plan to use the old piers and slide the new superstructure over had been proposed by the Missouri Department of Transportation.


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  • As plans have firmed up, the replacement of the Hurricane Deck Bridge has changed. The new bridge located on Highway 5 at the south end of Sunrise Beach will be completely new, though an alternate plan to use the old piers and slide the new superstructure over had been proposed by the Missouri Department of Transportation.
    After reviewing bids, the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission awarded the contract for a new Hurricane Deck Bridge to American Bridge Company. The Overland Park, Kan. firm was the low bidder at $32,303,295.46.
    The project was originally budgeted at approximately $23 million.
    MoDOT District Design Engineer Nicole Hood attributed the significantly higher price tag to a change in the market price of steel from when the plans were originally made.
    "There can be a big difference when you're using several million pounds of steel in a bridge this size," she said.
    The existing bridge is 2,280 feet long.
    Though one construction company did bid based on the alternative plan to slide the bridge over onto the old piers, the low bid ended up being the more traditional method of construction, according to Hood.
    The new bridge will be built less than five feet to the east of the existing bridge, allowing for a minimal right of way impact compared to having the same alignment using the original piers.
    No structures will be impacted, according to Hood, though there are commercial structures fairly close to Highway 5 near the bridge.
    There may be "minimal impact" to a entrance of one of these places, Hood said, but MoDOT is still looking into that detail.
    Environmental constraints studied in the assessment that was done was the reason the bridge is going to the east instead of the west, according to Hood.
    With the alignment of Highway 5 changing slightly for the new bridge, traffic impact will be less than if the bridge were to be slide over onto the existing piers, Hood said.
    "There will be very minimal impacts to traffic during the bridge construction," she said. "We anticipate some short-term one lane closures as the new bridge is tied into the existing roadway just before the new bridge opens."
    The other way would have meant complete closure of the highway for two to seven days as the new bridge was moved.
    Construction is expected to begin this spring. Use of the existing bridge will continue until the new one opens in late 2013. The entire project is set to be completely finished by spring 2014.
    The new bridge will be 38 feet wide with two 12-foot travel lanes and seven foot shoulders on each side.
    "We appreciate the input and support we've received from the community about this project," Hood said. "The community is very intere
    Page 2 of 2 - sted in this project and we look forward to breaking ground for construction this spring."
    After hearings and an open public comment period in early 2011, MoDOT finalized its environmental assessment in October. Plans began in 2010 after the highway commission altered the Missouri State Transportation Improvement Plan to include replacement of the bridge rather than the scheduled $6 million rehab.
    Built 1934-36 at a cost of $655,000, the Hurricane Deck Bridge crosses the Osage Arm of the Lake of the Ozarks at the 35 mile marker. The aging truss arch structure had a major rehab in 1985 and a minor deck rehab in 2006. Because of an outdated design, poor superstructure condition (rusting steel truss members and gusset plates as well as pack rust at connections of the spans) and narrow 28 feet width, it was considered structurally deficient though safe to use for the time being.
    The previously scheduled rehab was estimated to lengthen the life of the historic bridge only 10 years, which factored into the decision to replace it. The existing bridge does not meet current standards of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials on shoulder width or vehicular load design.
    Recipient of the 1936 American Institute of Steel Construction's Annual Award of Merit for Most Beautiful Steel Bridge in the medium class size, the Hurricane Deck Bridge is a landmark of the Lake area. Originally one of three cantilevered deck-truss bridges in Missouri all built at the Lake, the existing Hurricane Deck Bridge is now the last of this trio after the old Grand Glaize and Niangua bridges were replaced over the years.

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