The Osage Beach Police Department extends a warning to pet owners with temperatures expected to hover above 90 degrees this week. During summer months, dogs and cats can become susceptible to heat stroke in a matter of moments.


At just 70 degrees, a the inside of a parked car can become unbearably warm for animals.


The Osage Beach Police Department extends a warning to pet owners with temperatures expected to hover above 90 degrees this week. During summer months, dogs and cats can become susceptible to heat stroke in a matter of moments.

At just 70 degrees, a the inside of a parked car can become unbearably warm for animals.

"In just 10 minutes, the temperature inside your car can reach 102 degrees or hotter. In just 30 minutes, the temperature can reach 120 or hotter. At 110 degrees, your pet may have just minutes to live as it suffers heatstroke, leading to collapse, multi system failure, brain damage, and death," Osage Beach Police Sgt. Arlyne Page explained.

According to ASPCA Vice President of Veterinary Outreach Lila Miller, "symptoms of  overheating in pets include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse."

Sgt. Page recommends that pet owners who spot warning signs of heat stroke take immediate action. Place the animal in cool, not icy water, and rub them down with cool wet towels immediately. A cool wet towel placed loosely around the front of the animal’s neck is also recommended. Start cooling the animal’s feet first and work your way up. This will help reduce the chance of shock to the animal. Sgt. Page also recommends seeking help from a veterinarian immediately.

"Of course, the best way to avoid this type of animal cruelty is not to leave your pets in the vehicle in the first place," Page said. "This also applies to leaving your animals in the back of a pick up or in your yard without access to shelter or water."

Boat owners who take their dogs out for cruises should also watch for signs of dehydration. Dogs do not sweat like humans do. Their bodies get rid of excess heat by panting and by sweating through their foot pads and nose. Hot surfaces like the floor of a boat, boat seats and engine covers can also pose a danger to dogs.

Sgt. Page also asked pet owners not to give their pets alcoholic beverages, which can poison pets in the heat.