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The Lake News Online
  • Flooding on Missouri River slows down Bagnell Dam Plant procedures

  • Flooding on the Missouri River is having an indirect impact on the Lake of the Ozarks.


    The Corps of Engineers has been releasing water at record levels from Gavins Point Dam in South Dakota for a couple of weeks, and the Missouri River has been flooding for hundreds of miles downstream through South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri.


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  • Flooding on the Missouri River is having an indirect impact on the Lake of the Ozarks.
    The Corps of Engineers has been releasing water at record levels from Gavins Point Dam in South Dakota for a couple of weeks, and the Missouri River has been flooding for hundreds of miles downstream through South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri.
    All of that water is flowing south past Jefferson City toward the Mississippi River. The Osage River, which flows through the Lake of the Ozarks, converges with the Missouri near Jefferson City. The Corps does not want excess water from Truman/Lake of the Ozarks impacting the Missouri, so it has asked the Bagnell Dam Plant to curtail operations.
    Alan Sullivan, consulting engineer at the Bagnell Dam Plant, said the Corps of Engineers notified plant officials Tuesday that because of the anticipated flow past Herman, Missouri, operations here must be curtailed until at least July 5.
    “They asked us to cut back as much as we can so we don’t exceed the local inflow,” Sullivan explained. “If the flow (of the Missouri) is at 260,000 cubic feet per second and rising, the Corps of Engineers shuts down Truman Dam and asks us to cut back as much as we can.  With Gavins Point releasing 160,000 cubic feet of water per second, which is over twice it’s all time record release, we have been watching Missouri River levels closely.  Since we had heavy rains on the Missouri basin in the past week, it has resulted in extra runoff into the already full Missouri River channel.  This is pushing the river over the 260,000 mark sometime on Wednesday, resulting in the Corps request.”
    Based on current projections by the Corps, the Missouri River may dip below the 260,000 cfs by early next week. If that happens, the Bagnell Plant will begin discussions about increasing the flow through Bagnell Dam.
    The lake level at the lake should remain between 659 and 659.5 feet above sea level through the holiday weekend.
    There won’t be any significant impact on electric distribution in the Ameren Missouri system without Bagnell Dam in operation.
    “We feed into a big power grid as do other plants in our system so when we’re not running at Bagnell Dam, power flows into the system from other points,” Sullivan explained.  “Ameren has a power dispatcher in St. Louis who monitors electric demand. He makes sure the supply equals the demand at all times.”
    So, boaters, visitors and locals enjoying the lake this weekend will not feel the impact of the Missouri River which has devastated hundreds of thousands of acres of bottom land within the basin.
    Editor's Note:  The reference to Minot, N.D., as part of the Missouri River basin was incorrect and has been removed. Minot is not directly affected by the Missouri River flooding. Minot is being flooded by the overflowing Souris River, which flows north into Canada.
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