QUESTION: Several tornadoes touched down across the U.S. last week, killing 22 people in North Carolina, the most fatalities. The National Weather Service, Tuesday, predicts rounds of severe storms this week. Is there enough education about how to react in these situations? What can be done to further promote tornado preparation? How are you prepared?


QUESTION: Several tornadoes touched down across the U.S. last week, killing 22 people in North Carolina, the most fatalities. The National Weather Service, Tuesday, predicts rounds of severe storms this week. Is there enough education about how to react in these situations? What can be done to further promote tornado preparation? How are you prepared?

In this day, age, most are aware
In this day and age of TV, radio, computers and weather radios, I think that most everyone is aware of the severe storm and tornado safety rules. Schools, hospitals, nursing homes and workplaces have regular tornado and fire drills and have fire evacuation routes posted.
In my neighborhood, law enforcement and fire protection personnel are out risking their own lives warning people when a tornado is in the area. How can we ever thank them? One might argue that more tornado sirens should be put up in rural areas. At the same time, there is an argument that weather alert radios are easily purchased at any electronics store.
The people I worry about the most are the elderly and the disabled, who may not be able to get to their safety spot quick enough. Perhaps their friends or families can assist them, if they have enough warning before a storm comes in. I know that some commercial trailer and RV parks do have storm shelters. I think that commercial trailer and RV parks should be required to have adequate storm shelters. Anyone who has a private trailer might look into putting in a private shelter. A little peace of mind would be well worth the cost.
I am fortunate enough to have a basement, so I generally head downstairs with my flashlight when the tornado sirens start going off. Of course, I monitor the weather on the TV first to see what I need to do. I make sure that Nicky, my cat, is with me and find a secure spot away from my breaker panel and windows. The last thing I would need would be to get shocked or hit by broken glass.
James R. Hall, Camdenton

Media hype makes storm worse
I think the National Weather Service does a good job in predicting and warning. What I think is a bit over the top is the melodramatic way in which TV has spun this up. All the squealing, beeping and sinister music is meant to scare people. I find it a bit ridiculous. Give us the facts, stop making it more than it is. Aren't tornadoes and severe weather bad enough? KOLR 10 has become so ridiculous when it comes to severe weather warnings that I've stopped watching them and just go outside instead.
Mother Nature will tell you a lot if you just stop and listen.
Scott Hagan, Lake Ozark

Newspaper could help educate
We have a walk-out, lowerlevel in our house. There are two rooms below ground level with no windows. These are our designated shelter areas. We have a weather radio on all the time and flashlights in almost every room. We have bottled water in case the power goes out.
I'm sure the experts would advise further precautions. The paper has columns for fishing, hunting, eating right, etc. Why not add one on safety?
Every summer, we read about people being injured and/or killed due to preventable accidents or foolish behavior. Safety reminders and suggestions could well reduce that toll.
Francis Carr, Sunrise Beach